Old Bridge, NJ Metal Band Lords of Mercy Announce Upcoming Tour Dates with Anvil

imageFormed in 2011, Asbury Music Award-nominees LORDS OF MERCY hark back to the early days of thrash metal, hailing from the hub of the East Coast heavy music scene. In addition, LORDS OF MERCY are connected to the notable New Jersey musical grassroots organization Old Bridge Metal Militia, which paved the way for some of today’s top heavy metal acts such as Metallica, Slayer, Anthrax, Anvil, and more.

Lead guitarist Danny Anniello states, LORDS OF MERCY are very excited to be doing more shows with Anvil. They are great guys and a great band that always goes full on and gives it all they’ve got. We are looking forward to playing in front of new audiences and kicking some new life into each stage that we rock. Like AnvilLords will be going full-on, so expect nothing less!”

Prevailing with a purpose to end the monotony of current trends and bring back the originality that put New Jersey on the heavy metal map, LORDS OF MERCY lead the fall touring season with a brief run of upcoming tour dates with Anvil. See below for a list of current tour dates, all within the tri-state area:

LORDS OF MERCY W/ ANVIL
10/15 - Patchogue, NY @ The Emporium
10/16 - Syracuse, NY @ Lost Horizon
10/17 - Long Branch, NJ @ The Brighton Bar

Do not confuse LORDS OF MERCY as a carbon copy of those bands of legends past, but rather a group of talented individuals breathing new life and innovation into a genre that is so easily repetitive and omitting passion and individuality. Listen for yourself by downloading the band’s full-length self-titled album released in December via Main Man Records, available here via iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/lords-of-mercy/id780793785

Through their significant connections with some of history’s hottest musical talent, LORDS OF MERCY has garnered respect from local fans and musicians alike, commanding a packed crowd while remaining grateful for the support of those sharing the scene.

Figure Announces Groundbreaking “Terrorvision”!

imageEDM/Heavy Bass producer and horror enthusiast FIGURE (aka Josh Gard) has announced his revolutionary show TERRORVISION, an innovative, visual representation of the FIGURE musical experience.

Tickets will go on sale Saturday, September 12th HERE. Go to www.TerrorvIsionTour.com for more details!

Terrorvision has been a concept I’ve been putting together for some time now, something I thought would go really well with my annual Monsters series.

I wanted to create the ability to compile tons of custom edited clips the same way I have compiled tons of music for my sets over the years. I’m a horror buff and I’ve amassed an extensive collection of classic shock theatre and obscure films which is definitely an inspiration for the visual direction on this tour.

Through partnering with Rane/Serato and using their hardware I now have the ability to map these custom visuals to my music on the fly, adding a brand new element to my live show. Many artists look at visuals as a way to simply customize the blank slates of wall behind them. WithTerrorvision it’s another dimension of my music. An intense visual backdrop giving my fans a window into where I draw inspiration; my vision as a producer, coming together on stage where the visuals brings it all to life. - FIGURE

Tour dates:
10/17 - Revolution Live - Ft. Lauderdale, FL
10/18 - Firestone Live - Orlando, FL 
10/24 - Soundgarden Hall - Philladelphia, PA 
10/25 - Skyway Theatre - Minneapolis, MN 
10/29 - Peabody’s - Virginia Beach, VA 
10/31 - The Amphitheater - Tampa, FL 
11/1 - Nightmare Festival - Darlington, MD 
11/6 - Concord Music Hall - Chicago, IL 
11/7 - BETA - Denver, CO 
11/14 - Club Rio - San Antonio, TX 
11/15 - Somewhere Loud - San Diego, CA 
11/20 - Ruby Skye - San Francisco, CA 
11/21 - Lizard Lounge - Dallas, TX 
11/22 - Republic Live - Austin, TX

Connect with Figure:
Facebook | Twitter | SoundCloud | YouTube
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Snot Reunite For U.S. Tour Playing Classic “Get Some” Album In It’s Entirety

imageLegendary Punk / Funk / Rock band SNOT has announced that they will be reuniting once again for a full U.S tour in which they will be performing their classic “Get Some" album in it’s entirety. He Is Legend, Thira, and Lydia Can’t Breathe will offer support. The tour kicks off on November 28th in Palm Desert, California and wraps up on December 23rd in Pomona, California. More dates will be added soon, so make sure to follow SNOT on Facebook for updates.

SNOT guitarist Mikey Doling says of the upcoming tour “I want to let you know we are ready to rock out as hard as humanly possible with all you SNOT heads around the world on our first world tour. I hope you’re ready cause we have a ton of massive energy to bring to you. SNOT is something special to us. We will enjoy playing our debut and only record GET SOME in it’s entirety for you live for all you die hard SNOT HEADS! SAY SOMETHING FOR THE RECORD TELL THE PEOPLE WHAT YOU FEEL!!

SNOT lead singer Tommy Vext adds “Words cannot describe how excited I am to be getting back in the road with my brothers in SNOT. It is a privilege to play with a band that has had an indeterminable influence over countless artists from the bands inception & thereafter. I’m honored to pay tribute Lynn Strait and offer Snot fans on an international level the live experience they may not have yet enjoyed.”

Tour dates:
11/28: Palm Desert, CA @ Shcmitty’s Tavern 
11/29: Las Vegas, NV @ Dive Bar 
11/30: Grand Junction, CO @ Mesa Theater 
12/01: Salt Lake City, UT @ In The Venue 
12/02: Denver, CO @ The Roxy 
12/04: Springfield, MO @ Outland Ballroom 
12/05: Des Moines, IA @ Wooly’s 
12/07: St. Paul, MN @ Amsterdam Bar & Hall 
12/09: Joliet, IL @ Mojoe’s 
12/14: Dallas, TX @ Trees 
12/15: Houston, TX @ Scout Bar 
12/16: San Antonio, TX @ Backstage Live 
12/17: Austin, TX @ The Dirty Dog Bar 
12/19: Phoenix, AZ @ Club Red 
12/20: Tucson, AZ @ The Rock 
12/22: San Diego, CA @ The Soda Bar 
12/23: Pomona, CA @ The Glass House

More dates to be announced soon!
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Sunday, September 7th – The Picturebooks Powerhouse Performance in Dallas Proves Rock is Alive and Well

Despite being a free show at Gas Monkey Bar & Grill, there wasn’t much of a crowd on this Sunday. That can’t be totally unexpected, given the bill consisted of a couple local acts and a touring band that I doubt anyone was familiar with beforehand.

Still, a little more than fifty people or were scattered around the massive patio that houses the outdoor stage; and those who did show up were rewarded with a show that they will not soon forget.

Headlining this night was a duo who originated from Gütersloh, Germany known as The Picturebooks, and this marked the first show of their U.S. tour.

No one really knew what to expect from this group. Even what style they would be was most likely a mystery to all, which made it all the more shocking when they began their set right at 10:15.

There was a lengthy instrumental intro, and right away the onlookers were shown just how heavy The Picturebooks were going to be. The sound the two produced was massive; and Fynn Claus Grabke banged his head and slammed his guitar down to several of the beats Philipp Mirtschink was hammering out.

They immediately transfixed people with that, and after warming up not only the crowd, but also themselves, they were ready to get down to business. “PCH Diamond” showed off the groups’ bluesy rock side, and really highlighted Grabkes’ voice and the great tones he is capable of. Mirtschink got plenty of attention too, though. The drummer held a stick in one hand, using that on the floor tom, while he struck another drum with the palm of his hand for a bit, before grabbing a shaker with sleigh bells on it, creating a cool effect.

They were on the attack, and the word “break” often seemed to be one they were unfamiliar with, as they tackled one song right after the other. They did what was almost like a prelude, with Grabke continuing to belt out the words, before stopping as he went and hastily changed guitars. “Woman what are you doing? Woman, who are you fooling?” he sang after getting back in front of the mic, the first lines from “Woman”, which quickly escalated from its hushed beginnings. It was drenched in raw emotions; and they reeled in the crowd further with it, providing plenty of moments to bang your head to. There was even a point where Grabke needed to adjust one of his pedals, but not wanting to skip a line, he quickly removed the mic and unwound it from the stand so he could hold it as he fiddled with his gear.

The applause that followed was almost as massive as their music had been, and they weren’t about to slack up. “1000 Years Of Doing Nothing” was every bit as catchy as it was powerful; and when hitting a brief lull, both Mirtschink and Grabke let their instruments fall silent and began clapping along. The crowd quickly picked up on that, and decided to help them out. However, the part that got everyone wide-eyed was when Grabke raised his axe in the air — holding it horizontally — before suddenly pulling it towards his face and assaulting the strings with his teeth.

Mirtschink fired up their next number; and sweat dripped from his hair as he laid into his kit, producing some forceful beats. Grabke used a slide for the next couple of songs, one of which I’m fairly certain was a rendition of The Ramones’ “The KKK Took My Baby Away”. Regardless what it was, there was a point where Grabke used his fingers to pluck the strings of the guitar instead of the pick, which just looked cool; and he knelt down to mess with his pedal board at another point, creating a loud buzzing effect.

All night long Mirtschinks’ floor tom had seemed to be trying to escape from him, and before going any further, he moved it back over as close as he could towards him, then started on the rapid, steady beat that persists for much of “E.L.I.Z.A.B.E.T.H.”. It was somewhat haunting in a way, as Grabke nearly whispered into his microphone, but once it roared to life, the kick drum was shaking the wooden boards of the deck.

“Thank you all so much,” Grabke told the spectators afterwards, kind of apologizing for the technical difficulties they had been having, and he laughed it off, joking that since this was their first show of the tour, something had to go wrong. However, the difficulties they were faced with went almost unnoticed by the audience, who was just caught up in this stellar performance.

“This song’s called Fever,” he stated before yet another song off their forthcoming album. Mirtschink laid his right arm over the tom to secure it, which worked, at least until he had to use that hand to drum as well. It was clear by this point that The Picturebooks were a rock band, the likes of which you just don’t see too often anymore. They had been offering up pure, unadulterated rock, which made the next sentence Grabke uttered quite surprising. “This is a cover version of the one and only Madonna,” he stated.

I don’t know if everyone even took him seriously at first, or just thought that was a joke. It wasn’t.

I doubt “Lucky Star” has ever sounded the way these two guys made it sound this night. The percussion was deafening; the vocals were gritty; and to cap it all off, it was an explosion of hard rock. Grabke got super into it, moving all over the stage and whipping his hair out of the way whenever it covered his face. They managed to turn that old pop number into something entirely different, and I actually thought it was one of their best songs of the night.

Mirtschink led them right into their next number, as they brought things back down with the gentle and often sweet, “All Of My Life”. “The Rabbit And The Wolf!” Grabke shouted before they kicked things back up several notches with the song by that name. Mirtschink again used his hand to strike one of the drums for a time on that high-energy number; and as it ended, he finally used the decent sized bell that was set up to his right, which created a good chiming effect.

“This is going to be our last song of the night…” Grabke then informed everyone, which truly seemed to astonish the crowd, and certainly disappointed them. They may not have had many, if any, fans when they rolled in to town this day, but they had made a lot in their short time on stage. He went on to say this was the first single off Imaginary Horse, which is due out exactly one month from this gig.

They ended their 41-minute long set in the same vein it had begun: with a fiery track that evokes some aspects of the blues. It was titled “Your Kisses Burn Like Fire”. They might have been almost done, but Mirtschink wasn’t out of the woods just yet; and after the periodic technical difficulties this night, the microphone he had was hit and subsequently fell out of its stand. No harm, no foul, though.

The crowd was hoping for something more from these guys, and they made it well known.

Just before giving up hope, the duo returned to the stage, and Grabke let everyone know it was a B-side they had for everyone. “It’s called ‘Hail These Words’,” he said. Then it hit him. “Actually, it’s not a B-side, it’s on the album,” he laughed as he looked at his band mate. It was a good one to end with, providing a sharp rise and fall at a few points during it.

The band left the stage revered by all who had come out to Gas Monkey this night; and people swarmed the merch table when they eventually made their way over there.

A lot of people say rock is dead. That’s far from being true. In mainstream music, yeah, perhaps it is. On radio stations you don’t hear many true rock bands these days, bands the likes of which dominated the charts in the 70’s, 80’s and even 90’s. But just because you don’t hear any good rock bands on that medium doesn’t mean they aren’t out there.

Case in point: The Picturebooks.

These guys had such a robust sound to be just a guitar and a drum kit (I should note, Mirtschink didn’t have a single cymbal on his kit, either), and the music they made was some of the thickest, heaviest sounding rock ‘n’ roll I have heard in a long time. Their live show was every bit as impressive, too. You were often left in awe of the musicianship they displayed; and given how much extra room was left on stage, they did an incredible job of filling every single inch of it.

I’d go as far as saying this was one of the most entertaining and overall amazing live shows I’ve seen from a band, and it would be well worth going out of your way just to experience a show firsthand.

The Picturebooks trek across America will last through the end of the month, hitting Missouri; Michigan; Illinois; Indiana; Minnesota; Nebraska; Kansas; Colorado; Idaho; and California. After that, they’ll return to Europe for a nearly two month tour. Specific dates for everything can be found HERE. You can also pre-order Imaginary Horse in iTUNES, and get a couple of tracks instantly if you do so.

Drama Club Releases “Halloween365 (Never Coming Down)” Music Video; Announces U.S. Tour Dates With Black Veil Brides

imageElectro House / Shock Pop duo Drama Club has released the official music video for their debut single ‘Halloween365 (Never Coming Down).’ The band, consisting of Zero and Andromeda, has also announced that they will be joining Black Veil Brides on their upcoming U.S. tour which includes support from both Falling In Reverse and Set It Off. “The Black Mass 2014" kicks off on October 21st in Niagra Falls, NY and works it’s way throughout the United States wrapping up on December 15th in Albuquerque, NM.

There are no barriers in music as far as we’re concerned, because younger fans, today, are more open to multiple styles of music. We’re mixing up a ton of music for this tour, including a sick remix of Andy Black’s ‘They Don’t Need To Understand’ as well as some Asking Alexandria, The Used, Bring Me The Horizon, and others. Black Veil Brides may be a hard rock band, but there’s ‘No Hate’ in what they do because they create empowering music, bringing like-minded kids together in harmony. We’re also about self-empowerment, following your dreams, embracing your own individuality, and, above all else, self-expression through art and music. This tour is about celebrating NOH8, there is no judgment; it’s all about energy, expression, and acceptance. - Drama Club

The Black Mass 2014 Tour:
Oct 21 - Niagara Falls, NY @ Rapids Theatre 
Oct 22 - Columbus, OH @ The LC Pavilion 
Oct 24 - St. Paul, MN @ Myth 
Oct 25 - Chicago, IL @ Riviera Theatre 
Oct 27 - Denver, CO @ The Fillmore Auditorium 
Oct 30 - Las Vegas, NV @ House of Blues 
Oct 31 - Tempe, AZ @ The Marquee Theatre 
Nov 01 - Los Angeles, CA @ Wiltern Theatre 
Nov 03 - San Francisco, CA @ The Warfield 
Nov 05 - Portland, OR @ Roseland Theater 
Nov 07 - Seattle, WA @ Showbox SODO
Nov 08 - Spokane, WA @ Knitting Factory Concert House 
Nov 09 - Boise, ID @ Knitting Factory Concert House 
Nov 10 - Salt Lake City, UT @ The Complex 
Nov 12 - Kansas City, MO @ Uptown Theater 
Nov 14 - Indianapolis, IN @ Egyptian Room at Old National Centre 
Nov 15 - Royal Oak, MI @ Royal Oak Music Theatre 
Nov 16 - Cleveland, OH @ Agora Theatre 
Nov 17 - Pittsburgh, PA @ Stage AE 
Nov 19 - Philadelphia, PA @ Electric Factory 
Nov 21 - Stroudsburg, PA @ Sherman Theater 
Nov 22 - Worcester, MA @ The Palladium 
Nov 23 - New York, NY @ Best Buy Theater 
Nov 26 - Portland, ME @ State Theatre 
Nov 28 - Clifton Park, NY @ Upstate Concert Hall 
Nov 29 - Silver Spring, MD @ The Fillmore Silver Spring 
Dec 02 - Louisville, KY @ Expo Five 
Dec 03 - Atlanta, GA @ The Tabernacle 
Dec 04 - Lake Buena Vista, FL @ House Of Blues 
Dec 05 - Charlotte, NC @ The Fillmore Charlotte 
Dec 06 - Norfolk, VA @ The NorVa 
Dec 08 - Grand Rapids, MI @ The Orbit Room 
Dec 09 - St Louis, MO @ The Pageant 
Dec 11 - Houston, TX @ Bayou Music Center 
Dec 12 - Dallas, TX @ South Side Ballroom 
Dec 13 - San Antonio, TX @ Backstage Live 
Dec 15 - Albuquerque, NM @ Sunshine Theater

Follow Drama Club:
Drama Club Official
Facebook | Twitter | SoundCloud | YouTube | Instagram
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The Phuss Release New Music Video; Announce October Tour

imageDallas favorites, The Phuss, recently released a video for “I Don’t Feel Good”, one of the singles off their forthcoming LP - their first since signing with Magnetic Eye Records.

The footage was filmed a few months back, and takes place at a house party. Basically, it perfectly embodies everything The Phuss is about.

Both the video and the song are about letting loose and having a good time, and if debauchery happens to be involved, well… that just makes it all the better.

The release date for On The Prowl is slated for October 14th, and in support of the record, the trio will be hitting the road, going down to Florida and up the East Coast, before heading back and eventually ending it in Oklahoma.

They’ll be spending nearly the whole month out traveling, and if they’re coming to a town near you, you don’t want to miss out on the gritty, raw performance they are known for.

Tour dates:
10/2 - Dallas, TX @ Three Links

10/3 - Austin, TX @ Spider House Ballroom

10/4 - Houston, TX @ Warehouse Live

10/5 - Pensacola, FL @ The Handel Bar

10/6 - Orlando, FL @ Will’s Pub

10/7 - Gainesville, FL @ Loosy’s

10/8 - Atlanta, GA @ The Basement

10/10 - Johnson City, TN @ The Hideaway

10/11 - Richmond, VA @ Wonderland

10/12 - Washington DC @ The Velvet Lounge

10/15 - Baltimore, MD @ Club K

10/16 - Philadelphia, PA @ Dobb’s

10/17 - Asbury Park, NJ @ Wonderloft

10/18 - New York City, NY @ Piano’s

10/19 - Providence, RI @ Dusk

10/20 - Cambridge, MA @ T.T. the Bear’s

10/21 - Albany, NY @ The Low Beat

10/23 - Detroit, MI @ The Lovely Touch

10/24 - Louisville, KY @ The Mag Bar

10/25 - Ft. Smith, AR @ The Elephant Room

10/26 - Tulsa, OK @ The Yetti


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Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen Earn 4 IBMA Award Nominations, Including Instrumental Group of the Year

imageHot on the heels of their Aug. 12 Compass Records release, Cold Spell, Washington, D.C.’s Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen learned they received multiple 2014 International Bluegrass Music Award nominations, including a repeat nomination for Instrumental Group of the Year. And last week, the album entered Billboard’s Bluegrass Music Chart with a Hot Shot Debut at No. 3.

The Nashville-based International Bluegrass Music Association also nominated bandleader Solivan for Male Vocalist of the Year and Mandolin Player of the Year, and 2013 Banjo Player of the Year winner Mike Munford earned another nomination for that award. In 2013, guitarist Chris Luquette received the Momentum Award for Instrumentalist of the Year, a performance award. The band, which also includes bassist Danny Booth, was nominated for Recorded Event of the Year and Emerging Artist of the Year in addition to the Instrumental Group nod.

The 25th annual International Bluegrass Music Awards will take place October 2 at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts Memorial Auditorium in Raleigh, N.C., as part of IBMA’s World of Bluegrass Week.

In addition to appearing in Raleigh, the band’s got a full schedule of tour dates through October, starting with a week in Sorrento, British Columbia, at the Nimble Fingers Bluegrass & Oldtime Music Festival. (See list below.)

Following their appearance in June at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, No Depression’s Jake Schepps wrote: “Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen, with their blazing IBMA Banjo Player of the Year Mike Munford, put on a fantastic show … I love this band. Great energy and superlative musicianship.”

The band’s 2013 Compass Records debut, On The Edge, reached the top 10 on Billboard’s Bluegrass Albums chart. With guests Leon Alexander, Sam Bush, John Cowan, Rob Ickes and Megan McCormick, Cold Spell is poised to do the same. For a look at what the excitement’s about, view their performance of “No Life in This Town,” recorded by videographer Dan Foldes at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival.

For ticket information and show updates, check dirtykitchenband.com/schedule.

Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen tour dates:
Aug. 23-29 – NimbleFingers Bluegrass & Oldtime Music Festival, Sorrento, B.C., Canada
Aug. 31 – Delaware Valley Bluegrass Festival, Woodstown, N.J.
Sept. 4 – The Tractor Tavern, Seattle
Sept. 5 – Alberta Rose Theatre, Portland, Ore.
Sept. 6-7 – Sisters Folk Festival, Sisters, Ore. (with Peter Rowan)
Sept. 12 – Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, N.Y.
Sept. 13 – The Cooperage (RiverFolk Concerts), Honesdale, Pa.
Sept. 14 –Hill Center (American Roots Music Series), Washington, D.C.
Sept. 14 – Hampstead Hill Festival, Baltimore 
Sept. 18 – Ashland Coffee & Tea, Ashland, Va. (CD release show)
Sept. 19-20 – Berlin Fiddler’s Convention, Berlin, Md.
Sept. 20 – Dogfish Head Brewpub, Rehoboth Beach, Del.
Oct. 1 – IBMA World of Bluegrass (live broadcast), Raleigh, N.C.
Oct. 2 – MerleFest Bluegrass Ramble, Raleigh, N.C. 
Oct. 4 – Albino Skunk Music Festival, Greer, S.C.
Oct. 10 – Station Inn, Nashville
Oct. 17 – Bloomin’ Bluegrass Festival & Chili Cook-off after-party, Night Hotel, Dallas
Oct. 18 – North Caroline High School (Caroline County Council of Arts benefit), Ridgely, Md.
Oct. 19 – Philadelphia Folksong Society (with Spuyten Duyvil), Philadelphia
Oct. 24 – Palmetto Brewing Co. (the Loading Dock Series), Charleston, S.C.
Oct. 25 – Edisto Island Mostly Bluegrass Festival, Edisto Island, S.C.

Follow Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen:
dirtykitchenband.com

facebook.com/frank.solivan.and.dirty.kitchen

twitter.com/franksolivan

Lost & Nameless Hits Its Stride with New ‘When You Walked Into the Room’ on Sept. 9

imageWith their second EP of 2014, fiddle-driven folk-rock band Lost & Nameless are actually making quite a name for themselves. When You Walked Into the Room, releasing Sept. 9, continues the musical adventure the Austin-based foursome embarked upon with their March EP,Empty Spaces. That one earned them a succession of positive reviews, and the new one, also recorded in Nashville with Grammy-winning producer Bil VornDick, is poised to do the same.

In fact, When You Walked Into the Room was recorded during the same sessions that produced Empty Spaces, their fourth release since the band solidified its lineup in 2008. That was the year Patrick Conway (vocals, guitars and banjo), Chris E. Peterson (mandolin, fiddle and vocals) and Nathan Quiring (piano, organ, accordion and vocals) added Kimberly Zielnicki (vocals, fiddle, bass and piano) — then an 11-year-old fiddle protégé of Peterson’s. Four years later, she won the 2012 Old Settler’s Music Festival Youth Talent Competition.

Together, they create a lively blend of old and new that draws from a vast array of influences. Michael Corcoran, the dean of Austin music journalists, wrote of the last EP in Austin Post: “[It’s] full of songwriting a bit punchier than most of the newgrass stuff going around, with Zielnicki’s smooth belting a bonus.”

Austin Monthly added, “The latest feel-good collection of songs from this country-folk quartet might jolt you into a full-blown foot stomp.”

And Twangville noted, “Right from the get-go you know this is going to be an interesting listen.”

EP features six tracks; the title tune reflects Conway’s experience with love at first sight, while Zielnicki’s “Say Goodbye” revisits a relationship’s end.

The closing track, the only non-original, combines “Matthew’s Reel” by Erin Shrader and “Reel a Levis Beaulieu,” a traditional French Canadian fiddle tune. It’s made for dancing; come step out with Lost & Nameless when they walk into a room near you.

Lost & Nameless performance dates:
Sept. 4 – Heritage Place Amphitheater, Conroe, Texas
Sept. 12 – Cactus Cafe, Austin (EP release show)
Sept. 20 – Montgomery Wine & Music Festival, Montgomery, Texas
Oct. 19 – Central Presbyterian Church, 175th anniversary celebration, Austin
Oct. 19 – St. Richard’s Episcopal Church Great Pumpkin Festival, Round Rock, Texas
Nov. 8 – Fischer Fest, Fischer, Texas

Follow Lost & Nameless at:
lostandnameless.com
facebook.com/lostandnameless
twitter.com/LostAndNameless

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014 – Sidewise Serves Up a Heavy Dose of Rock at Cain’s Ballroom

For the first time in a little more than five years I went to see a concert in the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma. The only other time I’ve made the drive up there from Dallas was when Dallas (and Mid-West) legends The FEDS performed their farewell show in early ‘09.

At least this show was under happier circumstances.

I was pulling double duty, reviewing Sevendusts’ set for On Tour Monthly and Gemini Syndromes’ for this site. A couple other bands were joining them at Cain’s Ballroom this night, though. The Kansas City, Kansas-based Sidewise was one of them.

The quintet mixed metal and hard rock together, which was readily apparent from their opener, “Farewell to Virtue”. There was a lot of force behind it, making it easy to head bang to; and one of the guitarists, Matt Wilkinson, viciously screamed on some of the backing vocals. On the flipside, frontman Nico gave the music a semi-melodic component, singing in a hevy, yet smoother tone much of the night.

“…We’re from Kansas City…” he informed everyone afterwards, before announcing their next song was titled “Reconnect”. It was catchy in some regards, with potential to even be a good sing along to audiences that are familiar with it, something they didn’t have this night. “Make some noise, Tulsa!” roared Nico towards the end of it. It was around then that Sean Thibodeaux wound up breaking one of his guitar strings, and he quickly retreated to go grab a new axe. “We have a new album out…” Nico mentioned while killing time, adding that everything they were doing this night was off the Made of Matches record.

“The Fool I Am” was another song that had Jason Dean pounding out some hefty beats on the drum kit, and Josh Graves rounded out the good rhythm section with some good bass lines, while Sean and Matt ran about the stage. “Give it up for our brothers in Moks of Mellonwah who opened,” requested Nico, before they did what I thought was one of their best tracks of the night, “Prism”. “…Here I stand before you with my heart engulfed in flames…” went one of the lines on the first verse, before getting to the chorus of, “Why can’t you see this light that I’m shining through you? It never burned so bright, but I still can’t get through to reach the other side…” Lyrically it was an awesome song, and the music bed packed a serious punch, again mining more of the metal variety.

“Make some noise for yourself, Tulsa,” Nico told the crowd once they were done, really liking how much people seemed to be enjoying it. He let everyone know they might recognize the next one. Singing along was also encouraged, but before they could get it going, they lost the kick drum. “We can’t have a show without kick,” Nico halfway joked with the sound guy while he tried to resolve the issue. It delayed them just a few moments, and then they got to the song going. “Do you know it yet?” Nico asked shortly into the intro. It was “Head Like a Hole” by Nine Inch Nails, which struck me as funny in a way, considering I had seen NIN just two days prior to this. They did a good cover of it. They gave it more of a harder edge to fit their style; and Nico packed a lot of energy into it, really getting into the song. The audience liked it, too, and several were singing along.

“That was great,” he told everyone of their participation. The people weren’t done yet, though. “Let’s see some hands!” shouted Nico, as his band mates got “The Final Awakening” underway. Some horns went up in the air, while others started clapping along with the beat of what is the final track on their latest release. “If you guys feel like I do, I want to hear you scream!” declared Nico before an instrumental break, succeeding in getting a rise from people.

The band showed off more of their metal side with “Our Last Words”, which was a drastic change of pace from their other material in my opinion. I’m not even saying that was a bad thing, but the extreme screams that Nico and Matt did at times definitely woke you up and got your attention. The four of them on the forefront of the stage all thrashed about in unison with one another at times; and there was even a point when Sean jumped into the air and spun around.

“Cain’s Ballroom, we have one more…” Nico said, a little sadness seeping into his voice over the fact their time was almost up. “…Let’s see you guys moving out there,” he finished. With the last couple of songs, they had been getting progressively heavier, and “Breath to Breathe” took the cake as being the most intense thing they did this night. Nico offered one more word of thanks as he finished the vocals, then left the stage for Matt, Sean, Josh and Jason to do an instrumental outro as their 30-minute long set ended.

They worked great on this bill, being very similar in style to the headliner and main support act they were setting the stage for; and based on the interactions they had going on at times with the crowd, I think a lot of people enjoyed them, too.

Their stage presence was pretty strong, and the energy they put into it all ensured they had your attention. Nico was a compelling frontman; and your eyes gravitated towards all five of them, as they each excelled at different points on everything they did this night.

Especially if you like heavier rock music, then Sidewise is a band you at least need to listen to. If they ever get down to Dallas, I’d be game to see them again, too.

Along with their newest album, they have a few others available in iTUNES.

The Rabid Whole Release “Don’t Stop Now” Music Video; Announces North American Tour Dates With Cyanotic

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Toronto based Alternative Rock bandThe Rabid Whole have released the official music video for their track “Don’t Stop Now" (originally premiering withBlankTV) from their upcoming EP “Problems" (out September 23rd). The band has also announced the first batch of tour North American tour dates with Cyanotic (The Terminatour)

This year is definitely a year of boundary pushing for TRW. The video, which is our favorite to date, showcases the horror/thriller genre…with a little bit of psychedelia thrown in the mix. We had an awesome time shooting this, and we think our fans will love it. Special thanks to director Peter J Arvidsson. - Andreas Weiss (The Rabid Whole)

Click On The Banner Below For An Up To Date List Of Terminatour Tour Dates:
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Current tour dates include:
SEPT 26: Chicago, IL - Metro - Cold Waves Festival *ONLY Cyanotic: 
SEPT 28: Chicago, IL - Underground Lounge *ONLY The Rabid Whole:
SEPT 29: Ypsilanti, MI -TBA
SEPT 30: TBA
OCT 01: Cleveland, OH - The Foundry
OCT 02: Pittsburgh, PA - 31st St Pub
OCT 03: Buffalo, NY - Broadway Joe’s
OCT 04: Toronto, ON - Bovine Sex Club:
OCT 05: Montreal, QC - TBA
OCT 07: Ottawa, ON - TBA
OCT 08: Providence, RI - DV8
OCT 09: Wilmington, DE - Mojo 13
OCT 10: New York, NY - Tobacco Road 
OCT 11: Washington, DC - TBA
OCT 12: Atlanta, GA - TBA
OCT 14: New Orleans, LA - Dragon’s Den
OCT 16: McAllen, TX - TBA
OCT 17: San Antonio, TX - Limelight
OCT 19: Tulsa/Oklahoma City, OK - TBA
OCT 21: Albuquerque, NM - TBA 
OCT 22: Denver, CO - TBA 
OCT 24: Tucson, AZ - TBA 
OCT 25: San Diego, CA - TBA
OCT 26: San Francisco, CA - DNA Lounge
OCT 28: Portland, OR - Tonic Lounge
OCT 29: Seattle, WA - Highline
OCT 30: Missoula, MT - TBA
NOV 01: Los Angeles, CA - Bar Sinister
NOV 02: Salt Lake City, UT - TBA
NOV 04: Kansas City, MO - The Riot Room
NOV 05: St Paul, MN - Amsterdam Bar & Hall
NOV 07: St Louis, MO - TBA
NOV 08: Madison, WI - TBA

Album Pre-Order Link With Single Download:
http://therabidwhole.bandcamp.com

Follow The Rabid Whole:
Official Website | Facebook | Twitter | YouTube | Instagram | Bandcamp

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014 – Monks of Mellonwah Warm Up the Crowd at Cain’s Ballroom

For the first time in a little more than five years I went to see a concert in the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma. The only other time I’ve made the drive up there from Dallas was when Dallas (and Mid-West) legends The FEDS performed their farewell show in early ‘09.

At least this show was under happier circumstances.

I was pulling double duty, reviewing Sevendusts’ set for On Tour Monthly and Gemini Syndromes’ for this site. A couple other bands were joining them at Cain’s Ballroom this night, though. Like the opener, Monks of Mellonwah.

The band from Sydney, Australia has been touring the states for a bit, and wound up landing a spot on a few of these final dates Sevendust had planned.

Style wise, they were different, fitting more of an alt rock, even indie sound. The early birds who got here didn’t seem to mind they weren’t hard rock, though; and those who had made it out for their 6:30 start time gathered around the stage as lead guitarist Joe de la Hoyde, bassist John de la Hoyde and drummer Josh Baissari began a lengthy, serene intro. It was “Ghost Stories Intro”, the first track off the Turn the People record; and soon, vocalist and rhythm guitarist Vikram Kaushik stepped on stage, as they rolled it into “Ghost Stories”. The peaceful pace of that intro didn’t last much longer, though; and later on, Joe tore things up with a guitar solo that led to a sensational finish.

They rolled it right into “Afraid To Die”, and John was thrashing about while laying down his bass riffs, which dominated much of the tune. “It’s a pleasure to be here in Tulsa…” Vikram remarked afterwards, and he also acknowledged what an historic venue Cain’s was, as well as dropping the word, “crikey” while he was speaking. (I couldn’t help but think of The Crocodile Hunter Steve Irwin when he said it.)

Vikram showed off the falsetto voice he is capable of at times on the catchy “Tear Your Hate Apart”; and upon finishing it, he pointed out they had a few “second timers”  there. He took a moment to work on a rapport with everyone, first thanking those fans for coming back, saying he did remember them and he was glad they made it back out. He then talked about their time in the U.S. “We came here a few months ago and thought we’d only be here a few weeks. Then we wound up on tour after tour…” he noted.

It was already easy to see why one thing had led to another for these Aussies, because their songs were both catchy and deep (in a lyrical sense). “…Come chat with us…” Vikram then urged everyone to do after their set. “…You can make fun of our accents, or we can try our Yankee accents on you,” he joked. Shortly afterwards, they initiated a clap along with the onlookers, and the beats Josh was laying down at the start of “Pulse” was perfect to clap along to. However, not many people joined along at first, prompting Vikram to playfully ask, “Are you too cool to clap or what?”

“It’s time for our ballad,” he told the crowd before their next song, adding they could “feel free to cry”. I don’t believe any tears were shed, though it was a lovely song. Joe and Vikram even got face to face with one another and jammed at one point, really slowing things down before Josh started working on a massive build up.

They had saved the best for last, and for the final song of their 25-minute long set, they went back to the Stars Are Out EP, performing “Swamp Groove”. It was quite bluesy at first, and while it retained those elements throughout, it spiked and became a powerhouse number filled with soaring guitar solos and mighty drumbeats that saw Josh become a madman behind the kit.

I didn’t know what to expect from the openers, since I had never heard of the first two before, but man, Monks of Mellonwah were a nice one to stumble across.

In terms of genre, they may have been a stark contrast from Sevendust and Gemini Syndrome, but honestly, the semi-indie style rock is often what I prefer.

As I kind of touched on earlier, they make it a little fresh. Maybe not groundbreaking, but while their music did have a certain radio friendly vibe, there was, again — as I previously mentioned — depth to the songs. They’re a solid group, too, and were extremely tight this night; no doubt a side effect from all the time they’ve been spending on the road.

Those who did show up early really seemed to enjoy these guys, and I know I’ll be seeing Monks of Mellonwah in the future. So, here’s to hoping a Dallas show will happen sometime down the road.

If you want to stay up on their goings on, check out their FACEBOOK PAGE. As for their albums, you can find those in iTUNES.

“Honky Tonk Metal” Road Warriors Scattered Hamlet Release Fan-Picked Video “Shelter” + Announce October 2014 Tour Dates

imageIf Stone Cold Steve Austin teamed up with Bo and Luke Duke and got into a heavy duty parking lot brawl on a Saturday night, you would have yourself the personification of six-piece outlaw metal band SCATTERED HAMLET. Known for their rowdy live shows featuring harmonicas, double and triple guitar attacks, and lots of whiskey, SCATTERED HAMLET has been described by Big Wheel Magazine as having “the feel and sound of the American South’s influence modernized for punk and metal consumption.”

Today, SCATTERED HAMLET has unleashed their music video for the track ‘Shelter’! ‘Shelter’ was produced by Grammy-nominated Jason Donaghy and mastered by the legendary Howie Weinberg (White Zombie,Slayer, Danzig). Keeping true to their loyal and growing fan base, the band took to social media and let the fans vote on which song would serve as the first video from the album.

‘Shelter’ is an autobiographical song that champions trucker speed, quitting your job and heading out on the highway – pretty much what SCATTERED HAMLET is all about! The video for ‘Shelter’ has been preceded by a series of behind-the-scenes “life on the road” videos released weekly, called Hell Rider TV.

According to frontman Adam Joad, a man who is known for performing on top of a beer keg with a shotgun converted into a microphone stand, “We’re pumped to finally get a video out there for the Skeleton Dixie album, we had been so busy touring, shooting a video always kept getting put on the back-burner.”

In addition to this video announcement, SCATTERED HAMLET is excited to announce a U.S. tour, hitting several markets this October. Fresh off a series of tour dates that included support for the Genitorturers and Wayland, combined with an appearance at this year’s Rocklahoma Festival along with industry heavyweights like Black Label Society, Kid Rock, Hell Yeah and Five Finger Death Punch, the band kicks off the tour on October 1st in Los Angeles, CA. Several venues are still TBA, so stay tuned for updates.

SCATTERED HAMLET Tour Dates:
Oct 1 Los Angeles, CA @ Viper Room
Oct 3 Kansas City, MO @ Aftershocks
Oct 4 Cave Rock, IL @ Hog’s Rocktober Fest
Oct 5 Columbia, MO @ TBA
Oct 7 Cape Girardeau, MO @ TBA
Oct 8 Lincoln, NE @ TBA
Oct 9 Des Moines, IA @ House of Bricks
Oct 10 Algona, IA @ Afterlife
Oct 11 Burlington, IA @ The Washington
Oct 12 Ottowa, IL @ TBA
Oct 14 Detroit, MI @ TBA
Oct 16 Lansing, MI @ Uli’s Haus of Rock
Oct 17 Nashville, TN @ Daisy Dukes
Oct 18 Pittsburgh, PA @ TBA
Oct 19 Philadelphia, PA @ Legendary Dobbs w/ Hellion
Oct 21 Indianapolis, IL @ TBA
Oct 22 Saint Louis, MO @ TBA
Oct 23 Tulsa, OK @ Vanguard w/ Hellion
Oct 24 Oklahoma City, OK @ Leon’s Lounge w/ Hellion
Oct 25 Joplin, MO @ Blackthorn Pub
Oct 26 Memphis, TN @ TBA
Oct 28 Louisville, KY @ TBA
Oct 30 Greenville, SC @ Gottrocks w/ Genitorturers
Oct 31 Hickory, NC @ Wizard
Nov 1 Gulfport, MS @ TBA
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Dope Releases New Music Video; New Album, Bloodmoney, Due Out Spring 2015

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For the first time in five years, Chicago industrial metal outfit DOPE is releasing a brand new music video for their newest track “Selfish" exclusively through LOUDWIRE.COM today. Fans were chomping at the bit when the band teased new music last year and again last week here and here, so DOPEfanatics will be pleased to consume a full featured video of an entire new song. For the first time in five years, Chicago industrial metal outfit DOPE is releasing a brand new music video for their newest track “Selfish" exclusively through LOUDWIRE.COM today. Fans were chomping at the bit when the band teased new music last year and again last week here and here, so DOPEfanatics will be pleased to consume a full featured video of an entire new song.

CLICK HERE TO WATCH

Directed by Edsel himself, this is the first music video the band has unleashed to the masses in five years. “Very excited to begin sharing new Dope music with our fans,” says founder and frontman Edsel Dope. DOPE is returning with a vengeance after a five year hiatus that concluded after touring alongsideBLACK LABEL SOCIETY & SEVENDUST following the release of the bands 5th album No Regrets. Edsel continues, “These are some of our most punishing works to date.”

To celebrate, DOPE has announced a batch of tour dates with Hed PE kicking off on Friday August 29th at the Thompson House in Newport, KY. Visit the band’s official website for full tour date listings.

Tour dates:
8/29 — Newport, Ky. — Thompson House
8/30 — Grand Rapids, Mich. — The Stache at the Intersection
8/31 — Peoria, Ill. — Limelight Eventplex
9/2 — Sioux Falls, S.D. — The District
9/3 — Spring Lake Park, Minn. — Povlitzkis 65
9/4 — Chippewa Falls, Wis. — Every Buddy’s Bar
9/5 — Joliet, Ill. — Mojoes
9/6 — Flint, Mich. — Machine Shop
9/7 — Kent, Ohio — Outpost
9/8 — Dayton, Ohio — Oddbody’simage
Wayne Static Announces Co-Headline Tour with Powerman 5000

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Wayne Static, the founding member and leader of Evil Disco innovators Static-X will be hitting the road this fall on a co-headline run with Powerman 5000. American Head Charge will provide support on most dates. The tour will kick off November 6th in Waterloo, IA and is currently scheduled to run through November 30th in McCallen, TX. A complete list of dates can be found below. More dates will be added in the coming weeks.

STATIC on the upcoming tour:
“2014 has been an awesome year! We just finished up the 15th anniversary Wisconsin Death Trip tour. I’ve got the best band behind me that I’ve ever had, and I am very excited to round out the year with a co-headline tour with Powerman 5000. It’s another 15th anniversary tour! It’s a testament to both bands that we are both still going strong and the timing is perfect for us to tour together again. I am equally excited to share the stage with American Head Charge again. I believe it was 2005 when we toured together last. This is a great line up and this tour is gonna kill!”

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Wayne Static w/ Powerman 5000:
11/6: Waterloo, IA @ Spicoli’s Rock Garden/Reverb* 
11/7: Madison, WI @ High Noon Saloon 
11/8: Kimberly, WI @ Savagefest @ Tanner’s Entertainment Complex 
11/9: Fort Wayne, IN @ Piere’s 
11/11: Joliet, IL @ Mojoe’s 
11/12: Cleveland, OH @ Agora Theater 
11/13: Flint, MI @ Machine Shop 
11/14: Syracuse, NY @ Lost Horizon 
11/15: Stafford, CT @ Palace Theater 
11/16: New York, NY @ BB Kings 
11/17: Baltimore, MD @ Baltimore Soundstage 
11/19: Wilmington, NC @ Ziggy’s 
11/21: Atalnta, GA @ 120 Tavern 
11/22: Winston-Salem, NC @ Ziggy’s 
11/23: Knoxville, TN @ The International 
11/26: San Antonio, TX @ Backstage Live 
11/27: Tyler, TX @ Clicks 
11/28: Houston, TX @ Scout Bar 
11/29: Dallas, TX @ Trees 
11/30: McCallen, TX @ Metropolis

*No American Head Charge

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Friday, August 22nd, 2014 - Aerosmith Lets Rock Rule in Dallas; and Joey Kramer Returns

Just a couple weeks before Aerosmith was set to play American Airlines Center in Dallas, fans were not only concerned about the health of drummer Joey Kramer, but also if the show would even be going on in the first place.

Whatever the minor procedure was that Kramer had to undergo had kept him away from the kit; and while the show had gone on in other cities (with his son filling in), he had yet to make a full return to the stage.

Whether he would be present in Dallas or not remained to be seen, as the masses filled the arena. By the time nine-o’clock rolled around, all three levels of the venue along with the floor were packed with fans that covered the age spectrum.

I’ll also point out that one of the many songs that played over the PA system to entertain the crowd happened to “Backslider” by The Toadies. Sure, they’re nowhere on the global level of fame that Aerosmith is, though I still found it neat that a track form that iconic Texas act would happen to get played.

The lights went out at 9:12, and the massive space was filled with nothing but screams.

“Please welcome, from Boston, Massachusetts, the world’s greatest rock band!” said the voice of an announcer, barely audible over all the excitement that was being expressed.

A runway led from the stage out deep into part of the crowd, to those who were lucky enough to have floor seats; and the stage of sorts at the end of it was suddenly blanketed in smoke. A panel in the floor opened up, and from it rose Steven Tyler and Joe Perry, still engulfed in the thick haze. Tom Hamilton and Brad Whitford entered from the wings of the stage, as did Joey Kramer. It had been two weeks since he last played a full show with his band mates, and the Dallas fans would be fortunate enough to see his triumphant return.

So began 79-minutes of near non-stop action, as the legendary rock group kicked off their set with “Love In A Elevator”. Of course, the guitar solo belonged to Perry, who now stood alone at the end of the platform, shredding, though Whitford also shone brightly on it; and he and Tyler stood back to back for a bit during that time. Tyler was also getting in on the guitar action, using his mic stand (which was in tow almost constantly as he traversed the stage) as a faux axe, and he was owning it. Some fun was also had with the lyrics this night, like on this one, when Tyler shouted, “Kiss my fucking ass!” instead of “Kiss your sassafras”.

As the guitars and bass fell silent, a sample track kicked on. Kramer got no down time as he laid into the kit, delivering some powerful, steady beats. For that opening number, Tyler paraded around the stage draped in a sparkly robe. Even from up in the nosebleed section you could see all the lights reflecting off it, so it may well have been somewhat blinding to those on the floor.

Now, he took said robe off and looked at one of the cameramen, waving it in front of the camera. The impressive screen at the back of the stage showed all of it, while it quickly flashed between a host of colors, creating a psychedelic experience. The track took shape once the guitars and bass were added, and “Eat the Rich” was one of a few cuts they did from Get a Grip. Tyler was back out at the end of the runway, and he pointed the mic out towards the crowd on the first chorus, letting them shout each of the “Eat the rich!” parts. The coolest moment of the song came during the solo — again dominated by Perry — while Tyler crouched by the stacks of amps and pressed the microphone against them before they eventually brought things way down. Kramer then delivered some rapid succession beats as they picked back up; and Tyler ended it in true form to the recording. However, he first began to cough. A little violently at that, giving the impression he had gotten chocked. He stepped back from the mic for a second, then leaned back towards it, letting loose a belch, the likes of which would only come after a satisfying meal.

After two full-blown rock songs, they slowed things down slightly with “Jaded”, which came immediately after. Admittedly, I’m biased, since the Just Push Play Tour in 2001 was the first time I saw Aerosmith (or even attended a concert in general for that matter), but that’s a favorite of mine. It was a highlight of the night for me; and Tyler impressed the hell out of everyone when singing “…And ecstasy’s what you prefer,” holding that last word for several seconds. Even in his mid-sixties the man still has a voice that any singer should be envious of.

“Cryin’” kept up the slower, more emotional pace they were on; and Tyler wailed on “…makin’ love”, making a sharp transition to a high-pitched tone, before bringing it back down to his normal register. He even got face to face with Perry at the end, constantly yelling, “Baby!” at him, though Perry never broke focus on his guitar.

“Dallas, I need your help!” shouted Tyler, leading the entire area in chants of, “Yeah!” “Livin’ on the Edge” has been relevant for a few decades now, though with all the goings on all over the world, it seemed to be even more important this night. The first chorus was even changed slightly. “Every time you turn on the news, you’re living on the edge. When you catch your husband fucking around, he knows he’s living on the edge.” Later on, he bent down towards the fans, even letting a woman sing one of the lines, before pulling the mic back over to him. “…And everybody knows we’re fucked,” finished Tyler. Things tapered off, and the audience applauded, thinking it was done. Kramer then brought the song back to life, and Tyler ran around behind the kit and over to him, holding the mic by his head to let him sing the chorus. You could tell he was glad to have his friend and band mate back.

They had yet to show any sign of letting up; and once that one was done, Tyler mentioned a year. 1977 to be exact. “Come on, gentlemen. Take me back,” he said to Hamilton, Whitford, Kramer and Perry. A guy behind me was racking his brain trying to come up with all their songs from ’77, but one I did not hear him say aloud was “Kings And Queens”. Whitford became the focal point for a minute or two when he showed off his prowess on the guitar solo; and afterwards, they jumped even further back then ’77. The title track off Toys In The Attic made the spectators reach a fevered pitch. “Joe, help me out,” Tyler requested as they hit the first chorus, and both of them leaned towards the mic and sang. Tyler even had some fun at one point, holding an open water bottle down in front of his crotch and walking over to the edge of the stage. He squeezed it a couple of times, as a little bit of water shot out, and then the remainder of the contents were dumped on to people.

“Joey Kramer in the house tonight!” exclaimed Tyler, as he proceeded to lay down the beat for the next song. “He’s on fire! Watch it, he’ll get ya,” Tyler finished. Perry laid his guitar down, using it a little more like a pedal steel as they knocked out “Rag Doll”. “How are you doing up there?” Tyler asked, addressing all those in the middle section and the “cheap seats” up above. He was sincere with it, too, echoing how their performance had gone so far, because they weren’t putting on a show just for the ones who had paid for floor seats. “This place is fucking packed!” he said ecstatically, before handing the mic stand off to Perry. “… It feels like forever…” he said after welcoming Joey back, noting how good it was to have him back out there with them. “We’re going to play a little Boston blues for ya. It goes like this,” he then informed the crowd. They rolled out their cover of Fleetwood Macs’ “Stop Messin’ Around”, and Perry owned it for that time, encapsulating the frontman persona, even if he was stationed behind the microphone. Fans were also treated to one of Tyler’s harmonica solos, which was fiery and raw.

“What the fuck was that about that!?” yelled Tyler once he reclaimed the mic. “That was some original shit!” You know what else was original? “Same Old Song And Dance”. That classic was beloved by all; and making it all the more engaging was the clap along that commenced during it. “Show us some skin!” Tyler asked, referring to having people put their hands in the air. The end was ruled by Hamilton and his bass lines; while there was also a neat moment during the track when one of the crowd shots that wound up on the video screen included a young boy in the frame, and when he realized he was up there, you could tell it made his day.

“We’re gonna slow it down a bit. This is off the first album,” remarked Tyler. “I’ll give you a hint: I do not play guitar,” he joked. I don’t know how much “Mama Kin” slowed things down (if it even did at all); but even now, forty-one-years after that classic was released on their debut album, it still packs a serious punch. If anything, I’d imagine it’s only gotten better with age. As Perry launched into the guitar solo, Tyler, who had been “dancing” with his mic stand, left it out there on platform, and then raced up the runway back to the main stage. He danced about to the music his band mates were making, before having to make a return trip back down the runway when the next line came around.

“Do it! Do it!” he commanded, as they slowed things down with the gorgeous, “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing”. (You can’t deny that is a beautiful love song, and that beauty was conveyed wonderfully this night.) “Do you like the old shit, or the new shit?” Tyler asked once they had finished. It easily could have been a rhetorical question, because he had to know what the answer would be. “OLD SHIT!” the audience boomed. “The old shit? Yeah, me too,” he responded. Perhaps that was why they were playing so much of it this night, totally neglecting 2012’s Music From Another Dimension!.

They returned to the “old shit” with “No More No More”; and then they served up the first Aerosmith song I ever heard, and the one that made me into a fan: “Dude (Looks Like A Lady)”. Considering this was the first time I had heard it live, it made my night. Right at the very end, Tyler grabbed the mic stand, picking it up from the middle of it, and effortlessly tossed it back and forth in his hands. Usually you see a frontman carry the stand around for part of one song at most, and think, “That’s cool.” Tyler takes that to a whole new level, though, making you realize that any vocalist who doesn’t drag the mic stand along with them for every step they take is simply half-assing it.

From there, they dove right into “Walk This Way”, continuing their trend of not allowing for any breaks. Somehow, a woman ended up on stage with them during that song. I missed if she was personally invited up there or somehow got past security, but the band didn’t mind it. She was harmless in the first place; and she and Tyler shook their hips to the music for a bit before he motioned for her leave so they could get back to work. The instrumental outro was a little longer, providing an epic finish.

“Thank you, and good night,” both Tyler and Perry said to the crowd, as all five of them waved to the fans, and then walked back into the darkness of the wings of the stage.

Some people left. Others shouted that they had paid money and they needed more, even yelling songs, demanding to hear them.

Five minutes passed, and then, from the same trapdoor he and Perry had made their entrance from earlier, Tyler again returned to the spotlight. This time seated behind a piano.

“Darkness, darkness…” he crooned while lightly plucking the keys. It sure sounded like he was beginning the final track off Done With Mirrors, which threw everyone for a loop. He suddenly switched gears, though; and the fans burst into cheers. The applause and cheers were deafening, but that’s just how much “Dream On” is loved. When the rest of the band appeared, Perry wound up leaping onto the grand piano, spending a few minutes up there. When he hopped off, Tyler — who was now back in frontman mode — pulled his mic stand up there to deliver the rest of the track. At the end, he swung it in the air like a sword, bringing it around to his back, where he let it rest against his neck and gripped it with both hands behind his back.

“Going down,” he spoke as the piano disappeared back into the floor. He jumped off it when it got more level with the stage; and as he walked back towards the main stage, Hamilton was strolling down the runway. His bass solo stretched on for a minute or so, before turning into the familiar intro of “Sweet Emotion”. When the video board switched to Tyler, he was suddenly decked out in some neon like colored face paint, more pastel based. “…‘Cause a month on the road and I’ll be coming in your hand,” he sang later on, again switching up the lyrics.

The pinnacle moment of the song came when everyone except Perry left the stage. The guitarist had wandered over to the amps, where he leaned in close, creating some feedback as he continued to pick away at it. He then dropped it to the floor and proceeded to bat out an imaginary fire, and then came the best part. With it still on the ground, he laid onto the whammy bar, and one by one broke nearly all six strings, still holding them in his other hand, making for an amazing effect. With that guitar being rendered useless, he was quickly handed a new one, while his band mates retook the stage, wrapping up this 15-minute long encore.

The five of them marched to the platform at the end. The money shot was delivered in a blizzard of confetti that covered that fell on everyone in the first several rows, and looked like it may never stop. All the while, the audience was giving them all the noise and applause they deserved.

“Dallas! Dallas! Thank you so much for coming and watching this band rock out,” Tyler stated. He meant it. These guys still care. Even after all these decades, they still aim to please everyone who attends, and they do it.

One by one, Tyler introduced the band, including Buck Johnson, who had been back there on the keys and some other instruments. “He’s the one making me sound so good,” said Tyler. They then bid their farewell to the city.

The house music came back on, but then, Perry returned to the mic. “Turn that down,” he ordered. He informed everyone they had been challenged to the “ice bucket thing”, and they would be doing it in Houston, saying if anyone wanted to see it, then hopefully they’d see them in Houston.

One of the last things Tyler said this night sums it all up perfectly: “Fuck, yeah! Rock n roll, baby!”

I could go on and on, but I won’t. It’d serve no point, because everyone knows (or at least should) how amazing Aerosmith is. Even if you haven’t had the pleasure of experiencing a live show.

Bands aren’t made like this anymore. I doubt many bands who have found fame in the last decade or so will still be doing what they’re doing thirty to forty years from now. It’s even more remarkable when you think of all the turmoil they went through, and despite it all, they patched things up.

They still put their blood, sweat and tears into their shows; and even though there were parts of different songs that Tyler kind of mumbled though, no one cared. It would maybe just be a sentence or two when it did happen, and it was beside the point. Hell, I think he could have forgotten every word for every song and people still wouldn’t have cared, because he was so dynamic on stage. They all were, and it made for an extraordinary night where rock ruled.