Friday, October 10th, 2014 – The Dirty River Boys Album Release Tour Leads Them to Billy Bob’s

This night had been a long time in the making.

At the tail end of 2013, The Dirty River Boys ventured into the studio to lay down their next album, with the session stretching into the first month or so of 2014.

Ever since, fans have anxiously been awaiting the arrival of what has come to be called The Dirty River Boys; and this night they were doing the second CD release show of their tour.

They may have originated from El Paso, and currently call Austin home, but the Americana/rock quartet has amassed a good following in North Texas, and a lot of fans came out to Billy Bob’s Texas this cool, rainy night, showing them this can be a home away from home for them.

“How we doing Billy Bob’s?!” Travis Stearns asked after seating himself atop his cajon, behind his drum kit. He repeated the question, getting a stronger rise out of the audience the second time around.

They then got down to business, opening their 92-minute long set the same way they had when I last saw them (back in July), with “Raise Some Hell”. It works even better here at the start over its old closer spot; and even though everyone who was intently watching them was seated at the tables, many were still stomping their feet and singing along to the chorus, “…Boys, we’re gonna raise some hell tonight!” While singing it, vocalist and acoustic guitarist Nino Cooper often had a fiery, determined look in his eyes, making you think that this wasn’t just any old Dirty River Boys shows, and that look never left him this night.

Fans started clapping, though it was overpowered by fellow guitarist and singer Marco Gutierrez, as he opened up “Road Song” with some licks from his acoustic. He added some slight harmonies here and there on the fast paced tune; while Stearns delivered a ferocious beat, striking the cajon with one hand while holding a stick in the other to beat on the full kit. Those first two songs had come from the now two-year-old Science of Flight album, but now, they started getting to some of their newer material. Stearns grabbed a shaker, using it at the start of “Thought I’d Let You Know”. Gutierrez now took over on the lead vocals on the sweeter love song. “So I thought I’d let you know that I’ll never let you go; and I’m holding on ‘till a heart can take no more,” he sang on the chorus, while his band mates threw in some awesome backing vocals.

Upon finishing it, Gutierrez laid his guitar down and had just gotten behind the drum riser when he realized he was jumping the gun. He chuckled as he looked at Cooper and put his guitar back around him. They pulled out another (semi) oldie in the form of “Heart Like That”; and once it was done, then it was time for Gutierrez to swap out to a banjo. They kept that constant pace of songs up by going right into “Sailed Away”. Colton James stood atop the drum riser; the raccoon pelt that has hung from his upright bass was now mounted and stretched across the front of it, while a skunk pelt has also been added since I last saw them. He had done some backing vocals here and there so far this night, but now got to take the reins on that infectious track, while the rest of the guys created some harmonies on the chorus.

The banjo was shelved for a bit, and Stearns rolled them into their next number, as they dished out a roaring extended intro to one of the cuts from their first EP, “Draw”. “Come on!” Gutierrez shouted shortly before he started the first line, which earned some applause and shouts from their adoring fans. The final words, “And I know I’ll never ever be satisfied,” were drawn out, with Stearns striking his cajon at the start of most of the words to better accent them, before they tore back into the song, giving it a strong finish.

“This is the second night of our CD release tour…” Gutierrez mentioned during their first break of the night. Cooper then chimed in that along with these new songs, they would still be doing the old ones fans loved, like the following one. “This one’s about a union painter we met in El Paso,” he stated, which was more than enough to get some people excited. “Union Painter” is a certainly a fan favorite, and I was quite glad to hear it again, especially after it had been absent from the setlist the last time I saw them.

That started them on another stretch of songs; and now the two guitarists stared at one another, making sure they were on the same page before starting their next jam. “This is also on the new album. It’s called Loser,” Gutierrez informed the spectators, as they busted out the slightly more rock sounding song. He broke out his harmonica for “Dried Up”, which became a sing along at times without them having to ask for it, right up to the end where they added a bit of Bob Dylans’ “Just Like a Woman”. “Nobody feels any pain, tonight as I stand inside the rain…” he sang, going through the first chorus of that Dylan song, before they brought it to a close.

There was little time to clap before Cooper started counting, “One. Two. Three. Four.” The four then harmonized as they began “My Son”, keeping it up on each chorus; while Cooper threw in a wicked guitar solo after the second chorus. I’ve said it before, but it’s really amazing what you can make an acoustic sound like with the help of some pedal boards, because just hearing it, you wouldn’t guess it was an acoustic axe making that sound. Stearns was showing off some slick moves on the drums, too, even using a tambourine to hit the cajon.

Another new song came next, and while I’ve heard a lot of them out of all the times I’ve seen them this year, “Scraping the Bottom” did not sound familiar. It instantly became my favorite off the new record, though. “Open my heart and you’ll find two spirits at war; both fighting a hopeless battle for a hopeful soul…” Gutierrez crooned at the start of this darker number about trying to reclaim what you’ve lost. “…Once it’s gone, it’s something earned, not just found.”

After mentioning that the official release for The Dirty River Boys wasn’t until the following Tuesday, they pointed out those here were in luck, and could get their hands on a copy this night. They then went on to the subsequent track off the record, one about “life on the road” as they put it. “Highway Love” is all about that, and despite the hardships of it (i.e. doing all the setting up and loading out before having to drive well into the night to get to your next location, etc.), it’s all worth it if you love it.

Afterwards, they switched things up, and before they even had a chance to say it, some fans started shouting, “Chinese fire drill!” That’s what the band calls it; and now James was on the banjo; Stearns on the mandolin; and Gutierrez on the bass. The four of them clustered around a condenser mic that had been brought on stage at set dead center. “This is version two,” Gutierrez laughed, while Stearns began clapping his hands, making it clear he wanted everybody else to do the same. Fans were happy to oblige as James again sang lead on the tune. Cooper then took the spot directly in front of the microphone, while his band mates leaned in close to all sing on “Lookin’ for the Heart”, making it the most fun version of that catchy song I’ve heard them do.

In a twist, James was left as the sole member on stage, taking a seat in a chair that had appeared, while he clutched an acoustic guitar. “This song’s about a good friend of mine,” he said in advance of the albums 13th and final track, “Falcon’s Song”. It was the most poignant thing that was played this night, making everyone just feel melancholy, while they looked on, completely immersed in the tale.

“How many of you have maybe seen The Dirty River Boys once or twice?!” Stearns asked once they all resumed their normal positions. Much of the crowd cheered, though there were some who answered when he asked if this was their first time, and they made it clear they’d be back for a second. James used a bow (similar to say, a cello) to play his bass at times on “Simplified”, while Gutierrez just used a shaker for the first bit, before moving on to a harmonica. He picked the banjo back up before the track sprang to life, though it went unused for the time being.

“Skate and Destroy” again found James singing lead, and once it was done, Gutierrez joked that they were “pioneering skate folk”. It may not be the next big genre, though they make it sound pretty good. “Are y’all ready to sing with us?” Stearns then asked the patrons, before they pulled out one of their originals that every fan is familiar with: “Carnival Lights”. They got some help on it, especially at the final chorus, before tacking on a portion of Hank Williams’ “I Saw the Light”, which prompted both James and Stearns to remove their hats on the gospel-like song.

“It’s not all fun…” Gutierrez remarked, saying that life on the road comes with good days and bad days. “…And then you come to Billy Bob’s and you see people singing your songs…” he added, alluding that this was definitely a good day for them.

“Desert Wind” continued their set, and it was followed by “Teenage Renegade”. They’re two pretty contrasting songs, though they flowed well into one another, the first playing more to peoples emotional side, and while the other can do that lyrically, it has a more lively sound, making it easy to get into. Cooper proceeded to play some chords as he segued them into another song, and the notes had a real Spanish flare to them at first. “Thanks for braving whatever crazy weather’s going on out there. We’re having fun in here, though,” Gutierrez said to fans, most of whom were probably unaware it had even rained until stepping out of the venue later.

“Six Riders” started to wind down their set; and before their closer, they shared a little bit of hometown pride with everybody, noting that wherever they go, they’re always proud to say they’re from El Paso. The “horrible drug violence” in Juarez was brought up, as they briefly talked about how much it has changed their hometown, and they wanted to write a song about it. “Down by the River” is the lead track from the album, and the hard-hitting rock song finds both of the primary vocalists trading off constantly. It’s so dynamic that it’s a perfect closer.

They disappeared backstage, while the fans immediately started hollering for an encore. “BOOMTOWN!” one man shouted. He soon got his wish.

“What do think? Should we play another song?” Gutierrez asked the audience once the reemerged. He went on to say they’d be happy if they were even playing in front of two people. “Back in El Paso, we used to play for tacos and enchiladas,” he joked, though sounded completely serious. “This is too much. It’s too much,” he laughed, before Stearns took over, asking if everyone was still alive. He requested everyone’s voices, leading the fans in warming up their voices for “Boomtown”. Even after an hour and a half, they still appeared to have energy to spare, with Cooper and Gutierrez doing a good deal of jumping during it, while James spun his bass around at one point.

They went right into the last song of the night, with Cooper quickly swapping out to an electric guitar. It wasn’t for the Rolling Stones cover they’ve often done, though. Many fans were elated to hear one of their oldest songs, “She”. It was censored, with Gutierrez taking out the F-bomb on each chorus, singing, “…She’s like her own messed up version of a fairytale. Everything’s backwards, she ain’t no princess…” Each of the members were formally introduced during that one, too, like, “Colton ‘The Crawfish’ James” and “The thunder from down under, ‘Travis Stearns’.” Once that was taken care of, they went into an instrumental break, before bringing their 12-minute long encore to a devastating end.

This was one of the best performances I’ve seen The Dirty River Boys do.

Sure, they’ve been doing some of these new songs since the start of the year, gradually working more in, but you could tell the fact that this record is now officially out in the world has really energized them.

They were clearly happy up there (even more so then usual) giving the listeners a good taste of the new record, while still throwing in many of the old favorites. It was a topnotch show in ever regard, from the professionalism they execute their performances with, to the energy they inject into it, making it incredibly fun to watch.

Now that this new record is out, expect them to be pushing it hard. They already have much of the rest of 2014 mapped out, including an East Coast and Mid-West tour. You can find all of their dates HERE; and if you live in the North Texas area, you’re next chance to see them will be at Stanley’s Famous BBQ Pit in Tyler on October 24th. After that, it’ll be December 6th, when they return to Hank’s in McKinney. Also, do pick up their music (two LP’s, two EP’s and “Desert Wind”, which is only available as a single) in iTUNES.

Music Promoter Lee Sobel Produces Dallas “Mini-Festivals”

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Music Promoter Lee Sobel, via his company, GET IT ON PRESENTS, is producing a series of genre-driven live music events at local clubs that Sobel calls “mini-festivals.” These events spotlight specific genres to help bands build a local scene with other like-minded bands and to give their fans a full night of the music they love — be it Alternative, Americana, Psychedelic, Hard Rock, Funk, etc. Sobel is currently putting on these mini-festivals in NEW YORK CITY, PHILADELPHIA, BOSTON, CHICAGO, DALLAS, DENVER, LOS ANGELES, SAN FRANCISCO and PORTLAND, OR.

Lee Sobel is a former filmmaker who has been putting on music events for going on two decades. “Being a music promoter is about two things,” says Sobel. “Loving music down deep in your soul and survival.” Sobel will cover the travails of navigating the live music biz in his forthcoming book: LOVE ME OR HATE ME: A Music Promoter’s Survival Story.

Article in 10/9/14 SF CHRONICLE about Sobel’s Mini-Festivals.

Upcoming Events:
Friday, November 14th
Get It On Presents Dallas Alternarock Fest! at Bryan Street Tavern in Dallas, TX.
$10 admission / 21+ w/ID

Bands Performing:
8pm My Lucky Lighter
9pm Drive Thru Society
10pm Treeside
11pm Slybot
12am King for President

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Friday, December 12th
Get It On Presents Dallas Punkpop Fest! at Liquid Lounge in Dallas, TX.
$10 admission / 17+ Admitted (Anyone Under 21 will be charged an additional $5 by the club)

Bands Performing:
9pm A Life In Arm’s Reach
10pm Under Dog House
11pm Bullet Machine
12am Polish

Album Review: Snake in the Grass by Poppy Xander

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I’ve often said there is beauty in simplicity, and that statement can be applied to Snake in the Grass, the debut album from Dallas-based singer/songwriter Poppy Xander.

Almost all eleven tracks that comprise the record feature just her voice and a piano; and there’s something refreshing in the fact that there’s nothing over-the-top.

Don’t jump to conclusions and assume that it’s all ballads, or even remotely close to, say, Sarah McLachlan, though. It’s pretty much the antithesis of that; as the classically trained pianist uses her skills to create some intriguing music that focuses on depth.

From the opener, “The Ren and the Robin”, you’re immersed in a world of vivid storytelling and what some may consider a little offbeat songs (I mean that is a term of endearment). That one in particular is accompanied by a semi-serene, yet moody piece on the piano, making for an interesting offset between the often dark imagery the lyrics conjure.

Xander demonstrates her versatility right away, switching to a huskier voice on “Blackwater on the Rise”, which has a distinctive lounge vibe to it (along with some slight hints of jazz), and it succeeds at transporting you back to a bygone era. The following track, “Paisley”, is a standout from the record, as she taps into a more operatic side here and there. The song (which goes against traditional songwriting, as it does not include a chorus) is somewhat rooted it politics, for example, the third verse, “Take it from them, one percent; and hide it where they’ll never find. Line their country’s walls with dollars; bleed us dry and we’ll up rise.”

The next couple of songs take on a more minimalist sound with the piano being softer from the previous tracks, though it strikes when it can. “Lost Boy” sounds gorgeous, yet ominous; while Xander’s voice is utterly mesmerizing on “Paintman”.

Around the halfway mark, there are finally some love songs. Well, at least “No Way Out” is more centered around love (and the impending heartbreak that often comes with it); while the title track, the somewhat jazz inspired “Snake in the Grass”, is all about lusting after someone. Things switch gears yet again with “Time”. For starters, the piano is replaced with a guitar, and the haunting notes are behooving of what sounds like it could have been a spoken word poem when it was first conceived, before being set to a tune.

“I was Bonnie and you, you were Clyde. Take over the town in just one night. But you robbed of my love; shot up my hopes in a pool of blood,” goes a verse from “Darkness of Your Love”, drawing a very nice comparison between a past romance and those notorious bank robbers.

“Just Over the Rainbow” offers what could be a perfect finish to the album. It’s uplifting and brimming with hope; a stark contrast from how the album began. However, there’s still one song to go, and “Keep Calm and Carry On” again finds Xander focusing partly on politics as well as social issues. From being monitored by the government to people struggling to earn enough to make ends meet, while also going into debt to own things you might not necessarily need. It’s incredibly thought provoking, and easily the most relatable offering from Snake in the Grass.

I can honestly say this is the first album I’ve ever listened to that is just piano and vocals, and it made more of an impression on me than I thought it would.

Nothing about Snake in the Grass is typical of modern music. It’s rooted deeply in the classical vein, while the structuring of the songs often go against the grain. That’s what allows it to stick with you, because it is so different from… well, just about anything you  hear. Aside from that, Xander has a phenomenal voice, showing off a vast range; and no matter what the style is she has mastery over it.

The music may be an acquired taste; and admittedly, it took me a few runs through before the songs really started clicking with me more, but that just makes the album all the more interesting. It’s like there are different layers to each track, and the more you listen, the more you uncover.

Purchase the album on:
iTUNES / Bandcamp

Visit Poppy Xanders’ websites:
Facebook / Reverbnation / Twitter
image(Photo credit: Brian Hilson)

Idol Records to Release New Gaston Light Single / Video - Dream Good

imageSongs are insights into the soul. At least they are for Jason Corcoran, the probing singer-songwriter that records under the moniker Gaston Light. In the last four years Corcoran has laid bare his psyche in a revealing and transcendent batch of tunes that sound like the deep musings of a man twice his age. The 26-year-old artist released his raw, auspicious Gaston Light debut, Peel, in 2011, and then upped his creative game in the revelatory 2012 single, “Truth I Suppose.”

Now it’s time to dream.

“Dream Good,” the new Gaston Light single and accompanying video, opens with a swirling, haunting yet strikingly sunny combo of layered guitar, synthesizer and vocal tracks topped by an acoustic piano. Corcoran purposely channeled his influences, namely Big Star, Roy Orbison, The Animals and Phil Spector, to craft a tune that modernizes a classic sound.

“It was meant to be a power pop record,” the Dallas-based Corcoran says of the song set for release Oct. 14, 2014. “Originally the idea was Big Star meets Roy Orbison with that wall-of-sound production. I wanted it to be classic but sound like 2014.”

Lyrically “Dream Good” is about hope, to put it simply.

“So I’ll hold on and keep my eyes on the prize,” Corcoran sings, “I’ll have the beggar’s truth over a rich man’s lie/There’s a hell inside of paradise/Or so I’ve been told/Right now I need you by my side, my pretty baby, if you would/Before the sun grows cold and help me dream good.”

But all great songs are intricate in their simplicity. When Corcoran explains the genesis of the “Dream Good” lyrics he delves into the root of his creative mechanism.

“The lyrical inspiration stems from that hopelessly hopeful quality of Woody Guthrie,” he says. “There’s a lot of simple wisdom throughout his writings. Also, he has that quote where he talks about there’s too many song that knock people down and how the world doesn’t need any more of them. That really resonated with me.”

“Dream Good” was recorded in the spring of 2014 at Baby Bird Studios in Venice, Calif. Corcoran worked with electric guitarist Dave Green, bassist Dave Jones, drummers Justin Ivey and Josh Mervin, pianist and organist Mark Nilan Jr. and producer-vocalist Nathan Blumenfeld-James, who also helmed Peel.

The video for “Dream Good” should also resonate with listeners and viewers. The clip is a provocative, fantasy-like excursion that reveals the flip-side of the lyrics in an attempt to cement their hefty messages. It was directed by Dustin Bath and filmed inside a Motel 6 near LAX and the always congested Lincoln Boulevard in Venice, Calif.

“The video is a peak into what I didn’t want in my life,” Corcoran says. “You sometimes become aware of what you don’t want when you’re in the thick of it. I didn’t want to do some video of me shirtless running down the beach. I was ready for something actually closer to reality. It represents a ‘bad scene’ that can be visually appealing, but unless you’ve been there you know it’s not.”

Now that “Dream Good” has been recorded and filmed, Corcoran is ready for more. “Dream Good” is the first installment in a series of single releases followed by an EP via Dallas-based Idol Records in 2015. This is just the beginning. There’s more soul searching to come.

“Music has always been the one thing that has lifted me up throughout the years,” he says. “I wanted to finally write those songs that would do the same for someone else.”

Saturday, September 27th, 2014 – The Wind and The Wave Brave the Heat at Western Days

With it officially being fall it means it’s time for festival season to kick back into high gear.

Even the city of Lewisville gets in on the action with their annual Western Days Festival (sponsored in part by 99.5 The Wolf), taking place in the heart of historic downtown Lewisville.

All sorts of art and food vendors were set up along the multiple blocks they had blocked off; and there was plenty going on to entertain. Live music was one of the things that occupied some time; and, of course, that would be the thing that got me out here in the first place.

In all honesty, I was completely unaware of this festival until just a few days prior to it, when I happened to see a Facebook post from the Austin duo The Wind & The Wave, saying they’d be performing at it.

I had seen their first Dallas area gig about five months before (when they played the March Madness Music Festival that was happening in conjunction with the NCAA Championships), and I couldn’t pass up a second opportunity to see them, especially for free.

The weather was the exact opposite of how it had been back in April. Instead of light rain and chilly temperatures, the sun was out in force and there was not a cloud in sight. Actually, they may have preferred it the other way around, because this afternoon, the sun was beating right down on them.

It was 4:04 when Patricia Lynn picked up her acoustic guitar and Dwight Baker his electric; firing up a sample track with the drums and bass, as they opened with the incredibly infectious, “My Mama Said Be Careful Where You Lay Your Head”. They may have only had a couple dozen people watching them intently, but all of them seemed taken by the lead track from their From the Wreckage album, bobbing their heads to the music, while Lynn sang, “…Love taught me everything I know, everything I know. Sometimes you keep it near, sometimes you let go…”

“We are The Wind and The Wave from Austin, Texas,” she announced afterwards, thanking the city of Lewisville for, “having us at your intersection.” “It’s a lovely intersection,” added Baker, before moving on to the subsequent track off their debut record, “From the Wreckage Build a Home”, which was often haunting, but in a lovely way. “I want to rename this show Lewisville Skin Cancer 2014,” Baker cracked upon finishing it.

If you were fortunate enough to be in the shade, it wasn’t all that bad. Even the crowd at least at their backs to the sun’s rays, though the band had neither of those luxuries. “Sweat is rolling down into my eye balls and burning my eyes. That’s happening right now,” Lynn remarked. It may have been uncomfortable, but they weren’t going to let that stop them, as they carried on with a song about growing up and making your own way, as well as the importance of family, “Loyal Friend and Thoughtful Lover”. They then slowed things down some with “This House is a Hotel”, which at times showcased the higher register Lynn is capable of, and it sounded gorgeous. Baker had thrown in some harmonies here and there already this day, and did so again now, with the pair of them repeatedly crooning at the end, “It’s not at all good, but it ain’t that bad…”. “I’m not gonna lie, it’s pretty bad. It’s pretty hot,” Baker cracked afterwards.

They continued with “When That Fever Finally Takes a Hold On You”; and Baker riffed on his axe while Lynn took a moment to tune her guitar before the following song. His electric guitar was far more prominent on “The Heart it Beats; The Thunder Rolls”, which had some semi-dark undertones at times. It’s just a very moody track. Then, they switched things up.

A mandolin had been sitting in plain sight behind Lynn, and now she exchanged her guitar for it, while Baker swapped to an acoustic. They used them for a couple of songs, like the cherry, “It’s a Longer Road to California Than I Thought”, as well as another tune. “We are The Wind and The Wave, as you can tell from the thunderous turnout,” joked Baker in between the two songs, also mentioning their debut record had recently come out on RCA Records.

After switching back to their acoustic and electric guitars, Baker also noted their single had come out eight weeks or so before, and it was in the Billboard Top 40 charts. “But not in Dallas,” he said playfully. “With Your Two Hands” was the single he spoke of, and it was by far the catchiest thing they did (which is saying something); and I doubt I was the only one who felt compelled to tap my foot along to the beat.

“It’s pretty hot. I still haven’t figured out why y’all are all standing here,” Lynn said to the crowd after that song. Not many people wanted to endure the heat, though they did have their section of fans out, while others I think quickly became fans of theirs. “You could fry an egg on this guitar,” she finished, before Baker chimed in, this time saying that Skin Cancer Jamboree 2014 would be a great name for this. He got serious, though, thanking the sponsors and the city for having them as a part of this, before doing their final original song of the afternoon, “Raising Hands, Raising Hell, Raise ‘em High”.

In closing, Baker mentioned they had been asked to record some covers for the TV show Grey’s Anatomy. “Last year, or maybe it was this year. It’s all running together. Shit, I don’t know,” he confessed. A timeframe didn’t really matter. The most important thing was they had done some covers, and one was a classic from Simple Minds.

They had to wait for the mandolin to “recover from sun exhaustion” as Baker put it; and once Lynn had it properly tuned, they did their version of “Don’t You (Forget About Me)” to wrap up their 47-minute long set. They’ve made it their own, giving it more of a folk sound; and it was a fun one to end with.

It was a great performance; and for those who were fans, it was nice getting to hear nearly everything off their record.

What I like the most about The Wind and The Wave is all of their songs tell stories, and are often quite deep if you really pay attention to the lyrics. The clever banter is also a constant, and it makes them all the more entertaining. Let’s not forget about the phenomenal voice that resides in Patricia Lynn, which often leads you thinking, “Wow!”

Their Dallas fan base may not be strong in numbers yet, but it will be. Especially considering the national attention they have been getting for a while now.

They’ll actually be back in Dallas on October 10th at the House of Blues opening for Bernhoft, who they’ll be touring much of the country with from October through early November. A full list of their tour dates can be found HERE. Be sure to check out their record in iTUNES, too.

Get On It Presents Announces Dallas Mini Music Festivals!

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GET IT ON PRESENTS
, a national music booking and promotion company, announces a slate of roving mini-festivals intended to spotlight specific genres to help bands build a local scene with other like-minded bands. Each event will feature several bands of the same genre, allowing their fans to enjoy a full night of the music they love — be it Alternative, Psychedelic, Hard Rock, Funk, etc. The intention is to move these festivals around to different venues and to bring Dallas bands to other cities to play other mini-festivals that fit their music.

GET IT ON PRESENTS is headed by Lee Sobel who was a filmmaker before becoming a music promoter. The company currently puts on shows throughout the country. There are no fees to play these events - bands who would like to be considered for future events may reach the company through their website: GetOnItPresents.com

UPCOMING EVENTS:
Friday, October 10th

Get It On Presents:
Dallas Blues Fest!

Liquid Lounge @ 2800 Main Street, Dallas, TX 75226, 214.742.6207; $10 admission - 17+ Admitted (Anyone Under 21 will be charged an additional $5 by the club)

Bands Performing:
8pm Taylor Castleberry
9pm Texez Mudd
10pm Light Horse Harry
11pm The Buffalo Parade

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Friday, October 10th

Get It On Presents:
Dallas Alternarock Fest!

Bryan Street Tavern, 4315 Bryan Street, Dallas, TX 75204, 214.821.4447; $10 admission - 21+ w/ID

Bands Performing:
8pm My Lucky Lighter
9pm The Honest Mistakes
10pm Sparrow and the Clay

***
Friday, November 14th

Get It On Presents:
Dallas Alternarock Fest!

Bryan Street Tavern, 4315 Bryan Street, Dallas, TX 75204, 214.821.4447; $10 admission - 21+ w/ID

Bands Performing:
8pm My Lucky Lighter
9pm Drive Thru Society
10pm Treeside
11pm Slybot
12am King For President

Nothing More Tackles Social Issues with “Mr. MTV” Music Video



In an age where most music videos seem to have become simplified, with just the band playing the song in front of a backdrop (with scantily clad woman somehow incorporated), the new video NOTHING MORE released yesterday for “Mr. MTV” comes as a welcome change of pace.

Sure, the video is partly of the four guys from San Antonio, Texas playing against a white background (creating a very sterile feeling environment, stifling to any and all creativity). And yeah, a few of the woman that appear in it have the stereotypical model look as they dance around in revealing outfits; though it’s the message the song carries, along with the rest of the footage, that makes this music video so powerful.

For those unfamiliar with “Mr. MTV”, the new single from Nothing More’s SELF-TITLED record tackles the issue of consumerism, and even what an obsessive culture we have become. From buying what we’re told to buy (i.e the latest and greatest gadget that you never knew you needed until now), to being given a mold of what beauty should look like, and if you don’t fit that, than there must be something wrong with you, right?

The video plays out partly like a propaganda film, with “subliminal messages” being worked in left and right, flashing by so quick it’s next to impossible to even see them. “This is a woman,” flickers across the screen when first showing the models, digging at the fact that people are told that is how all woman should appear, before quickly escalating with sentences like, “You are empty,” or “You’re inadequate.” “Debt is god,” it continues, further hammering home the fact that we’re made to think the only way to be happy is by constantly buying material possessions; while the word “conform” later appears.

The propaganda feel is also seen in the scenes with people strapped in chairs — eyes taped open — being indoctrinated to all these ways, before breaking free and revolting against their captors.

All in all, the video is riveting — even chilling — all the way through the end, which frankly, is a bit creepy. So, if you haven’t watched it yet, what are you waiting? Check it out above!

It is extremely thought provoking, and how many music videos do that these days? I find it even makes “Mr. MTV” a more powerful song, because the band has fully fleshed out the story they’re conveying in the lyrics, painting a vivid picture of what they’re singing about.

“Empty me, empty nation, emptied us of inspiration. Bastard sons and broken daughters; we all bow down to our corporate fathers.”

Nothing More will be crisscrossing the country through October. Their full tour schedule can be found HERE.

Mothership Reveal Details of Sophomore Album, Mothership II

imageRipple Music and Dallas, Texas-based riffers Mothership are excited to finally reveal the details of Mothership’s highly anticipated second release, Mothership II. After months of playing their new tunes to sweaty, ecstatic masses both in Europe and on across the United States, the trio is excited for fans to finally hear the album in its entirety. For the album art, the band chose good friend and incredibly talented artist Zach “EZ” Nelson (Instagram – @ezwheelin) to hand draw his version of the galactic Valkyrie who also appeared in another form on the cover of the band’s debut album. For the album’s engineering, Mothership returned to Kent Stump of Wo Fat, who also lent his magic to the group’s eponymous debut album, at Dallas’ Crystal Clear Studios. Mothership II will be released on single LP gatefold vinyl and on digipack CD.

RELEASE DATES:
US: November 11th
Europe/UK: November 10th

TRACK LISTING:
1. Celestial Prophet
2. Priestess of the Moon
3. Shanghai Surprise
4. Holy Massacre
5. Centauromachy
6. Hot Smoke & Heavy Blues
7. Tamu Massif
8. Astromancer
9. Serpents Throne

The CD will have two bonus songs:
1. Eye of Sphinx
2. Good Morning Little Schoolgirl

mothershipusa.bandcamp.com
mothershiphaslanded.com
facebook.com/mothershipusa
twitter.com/mothershipusa
ripple-music.com
ripplemusic.bandcamp.com

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Beauty In The Suffering Release “Juliet (You’re Mine)” Lyric Video

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Oklahoma City based Industrial Metal band Beauty In The Suffering have released their official lyric video for their new track “Juliet (You’re Mine).” The track, originally premiering with Bloody Disgusting was written, programmed, arranged, performed, and produced by DieTrich Thrall and features drums from Chris Emery (American Head Charge). The track can be purchased using the “name your own price” model on the band’s Bandcamp here.

Saturday, August 23rd, 2014 – Wesley Geiger Tells Some Tales at Trees

The show at Trees this night was all in celebration for the new record Somebody’s Darling was releasing, and they had orchestrated a great bill that involved some friends of theirs. Friends like Wesley Geiger, who had been charged with opening the show.

Seeing a solo artist on the stage at Trees is a semi-rare sight; but even by himself, Wesley easily reeled in the crowd, which grew gradually as he mesmerized people with his opening number. He addressed the audience after that, mentioning what an “honor” it was to be sharing the stage with Somebody’s Darling. He also noted that he did not have an album out yet, but would be releasing one come November. “…I’m going to be playing some songs off it…” he said before doing a song I believe he said was titled “Shine On”. “…Sometimes it looks dark, but it just needs a spark…” went one of the lines.

It was already clear the common thread between his songs was they all focused on telling stories, all of which were rich in detail and emotion. “How y’all doing tonight?” Wesley asked once he had finished that tune. He informed everyone that he had lived in California for a while, and had actually just moved back to Texas recently. “I don’t know why I ever left,” he remarked, drawing a lot of cheers from the crowd with that one. He added he had spent a lot of time in the desert during his travels, which was where most of these songs came from. He proceeded to pluck away at his acoustic guitar, an anguished look spreading across his face on the little intro he gave “As the Crow Flies”. He was quite expressive during all of these songs.

He kept the sort of storytellers vibe up by noting this next song was one of the first he ever wrote, back when he was still in high school. If I heard correctly, it was titled “Tired Town”; and once it had been completed, he again told the onlookers he didn’t have any merch, but encouraged everyone to go get the new Somebody’s Darling album. His forthcoming debut record will be titled El Dorado, and now he did the title track from it. “…It’s a mythological city…” he said, which everyone surely knows. “It’s also a real city in Arkansas,” he finished, which was something probably not everyone was wise to.

I thought “El Dorado” was the best track he did this night. It told a story of searching and longing, about people who just wanted to find something to help make them complete. Already, his set was nearly over, and he finished with a song he said was real special to him. “It’s done me a lot of good spiritually. Emotionally, mentally, physically,” he said, chuckling a bit as he said those last two words, which appeared to be added more for fun. You could tell it was another song he really connected with, and it was a good end to his 35-minute long set.

Wesley Geiger was a perfect opener for this bill, and the Americana singer/songwriter spun a series of songs that intrigued you. You got the sense he has already lived a long life, and he’s put his experiences to pen and paper in a perfect manner.

Again, his debut, El Dorado, is apparently due out in just a few months, and judging by the taste everyone got this night, that will be an album well worth having.

Saturday, August 23rd, 2014 – Somebody’s Darling Rolls a Homecoming and Album Release Show into One Grand Event

This night wasn’t all that different from October 6th, 2012.

Well, it was considerably warmer than that October night nearly two years ago; but the other circumstances were quite similar.

Back in late 2012, Somebody’s Darling finished up a tour in their hometown, a show that also served as the album release party for their sophomore record, Jack City Shakedown.

The venue was different this night, and Trees can accommodate far more people than the club they did their last CD release at. The space was needed, too. This was also their first show back since completing a tour, which included some dates in Wisconsin and Illinois earlier in the month, while this Dallas show was their fourth straight, after doing a run through Houston, San Antonio and Austin.

Trees was pretty packed even during the main support act; and when 10:30 rolled around, people were already claiming their spots in front of the stage. By the time the curtain opened at 10:50, you were pretty much stuck where you were at, as folks stood shoulder to shoulder with one another.

The band had promised to play everything off the new album Adult Roommates, and they began tackling the release with the sixth cut off it, “Vowels Flow”. “Where’s your honey? Where’s your soul?” singer and rhythm guitarist Amber Farris crooned at the start, adding a lot of soul into the roots/rock number. Their performance exploded before the final chorus, when the quintet went all-out on the instrumental section, and Amber hunched over her guitar, tearing it up, as she first walked over to lead guitarist David Ponder, and then went to bassist Wade Cofer on stage left, before returning to the main mic.

“Alright!” she shouted in her twangy voice, as if to say they were just getting warmed up. With that, they went into the newly released single and lead track, “Bad Bad”, with Nate Wedan laying down a beat that was perfect to bob your head to. These songs may be new, but they have been worked into the live shows for months. Even back in January and February (the last two times I saw them) they were doing large amounts of new material. So, their fans are familiar with them, and that was what was cool about tonight. People already love these songs, and “Bad Bad” was one that received some mighty cheers as they started it.

The night wasn’t entirely about the new stuff, though.

“Where you at, Dallas?! Where you at?!” Amber asked, getting a loud response from everyone. “Let me tell you something,” she added. Nate had already started on the drum bed for the next song, and Amber then jumped right into the lyrics. “Well, I believe God made a lover for me…” she sang on “Back to the Bottle”. They played half of the songs from that previous release, and this one raised the excitement level considerably, especially during the instrumental jam, where the keys Mike Talley was playing where highlighted. David and Amber stood back to front with each other as they cranked out some notes, and shortly after, she and Wade were face to face with one another, rocking out. Her face was seldom seen during that time, as it was shrouded by her long, curly locks.

“Thanks, goddammit!” exclaimed Amber after brushing the hair from her face. “How you doing, Trees?!” she then asked, getting another rise from everyone. “That feels good. I love you guys!” she remarked with a warm smile on her face. As she spoke, a large cloud of smoke billowed out from the stage towards the audience; and then they went for one of their heartbreakers. Upon hearing it back in January, “Come to Realize” was an instant favorite of mine; and I do believe they made some tweaks while recording it. It sounded more fleshed out than I recalled, though it’s still wrought with emotion. “So I think about the morning, the way the coffee fell, and I came to realize I was by myself. And I wanted to know, was it me? Was it you?” goes the second verse of the song that epitomizes heartache. Wade lent his voice to the track, helping with some backing vocals on the chorus, and together, he and Amber sounded quite impressive.

“We’re selfish, and we like to throw parties for ourselves,” Amber joked afterwards, saying that was why they had The Suffers open up for them (that soul band from Houston had a party going in their own right.) “Let’s do it!” Amber finished, informing everyone this next song was titled “Set It Up”. David served up a superb solo during it; and upon finishing it, Amber mentioned that everyone in the band had done some writing on this new album, something that hasn’t happened in the past.

Mike was responsible for writing the next one. “It goes like this,” stated Amber. Mike and Wade crooned along with her on the profound chorus of “End of the Line”, “This is the oldest we have been; this is the youngest we will ever be.” There were many haunting elements about it as they slowed the pace down; and upon reaching the final chorus, the crowd burst into another round of cheers.

“Where you at, Dallas?!” Amber again asked, before informing everyone they had got home at five in the morning after their show in Austin. “This is why we do this,” she said, beaming at all the North Texas residents who had come out to support this night. David showed off his skills with another slickly done solo during “Same Record”; and once it was over, Amber asked for everyone to give it up for Wesley [Geiger], who had opened the show. “Once again, we’re selfish. We like to throw parties,” she joked.

“Alright, now here we go,” she said, as they brought out another oldie in the form of “Weight of the Fear”. The one thing with older tracks a band has been playing for a few years is that they have done it so many times, it’s just second nature. That was highlighted with that staple from Jank City. The clap along that came at the lull made everyone a part of the song; and David was killing it, often capturing everyone’s full attention.

“Cheers, Dallas!” Amber shouted, making a toast to all their friends and fans. “…We’ve been a band for a long time, and we’re excited to still be doing it,” she said, speaking of having a chance to put out yet another record. That said, they kept going with album number two, by doing “Keep Shakin’”. The amount of cheers and whistling that followed the end of that song was unreal. Everyone here was a die-hard Somebody’s Darling fan, and they were making it well known.

“Can I introduce the band?” asked Amber, who then took a few minutes to introduce “Red Pants on guitar” (AKA David Ponder), as well as Nate “Grizzly Bear”. “I stole the best bass player in town, and I don’t feel bad about it,” she remarked before naming Wade. Once that was taken care of, Amber swapped out her electric guitar for an acoustic. She said a few of them had a hand in writing this next one, as did Jonathan Tyler (of Jonathan Tyler & The Northern Lights.) It was the next to last song off the album, “Smoke Blows”, and despite the acoustic, it wasn’t that slow of a song.

The five-piece even dug all the way back to their first album, and the lone track they did from it was “Cold Hearted Lover”. Even now, it’s still a beloved tune, and peoples reaction to it this night proved that. Afterwards, something surprising happened. Wade, who is usually silent sans the backing vocals, spoke. “You guys know how to bounce?” he asked. “Come on, we need everybody to bounce,” he said, trying to get some movement going before one of the singles off Jank City Shakedown, “Cold Hands”. There wasn’t much jumping about, though Amber did try to get another clap along going. It started off slow, with few participants, though. “I see you in the back. We’re not starting till you’re all doing it,” she told the audience, prompting some more people to get involved. “I need this!” she shouted enthusiastically.

No sooner had they finished, and then David started them onto to the next one. Amber just laughed and shook her head. “We weren’t gonna do it, but let’s do it. Screw it,” she said. In the last year plus, they’ve made Faces’ “Stay with Me” into a staple of their longer sets, and I don’t think anyone would have viewed the night complete if they hadn’t done it. It became a massive sing-along, not just with the crowds aiding them, but also some of the many musicians who had come out to support their friends this night. Most of Goodnight Ned got up on stage and helped on the choruses, as did Corey Howe, from Dead Flowers.

“We’re happy that Trees let us party here tonight,” said Amber, thanking the venue one last time before they wrapped their 68-minute long set up with the final track, “Keep This Up”. More clapping was required as they gave their set a fun sendoff, as was singing. Even if people didn’t know the lyrics, the refrain of, “How can I keep this up?” was easy to pick up on.

If there hadn’t been a couple of songs missing, you would have thought they were done. But everyone knew better, and after a couple minutes of shouting, Amber ran back down the stairs from the green room and out on the stage.

“We got to get the boys out!” she said, looking that way. David returned, as did Nate, who simply sit behind the kit and watched his band mates during “Two Lords”. Amber had her hands free, and David grabbed the acoustic. “…It’s super meaningful to us. We wrote it about a buddy of ours,” she said before the song, which deals with two fellow musicians who took their own lives. “…I wish I could have told them I’d hate they way they leave,” went one of the lines of what was a chilling song, and one only those familiar with the D/FW music scene will truly understand and appreciate.

The full band was intact now, and they had saved their biggest two for last. “Wedding Clothes” was one; and as Nate rolled them into the last song, he proceeded to clap along to the beat he was delivering on the kick drum. Much of the crowd joined along. “Generator” was the final song they had to do off Adult Roommates, and it has been a routine closer for many months now. “Thank you again Dallas for coming out…” Amber said during the instrumental break, pointing out that the album wouldn’t be available digitally until September 16th, so everyone here was getting the “exclusive”.

That powerhouse number concluded not only their 14-minute long encore, but also one epic night.

This was what an album release show should be. A club packed with fans who are anxious not only about getting their hands on the latest release from a band they love, but also seeing them pull out all the stops to make this something more than just your average show.

The last few times I had seen Somebody’s Darling they were clicking on a level that affirmed they were one of the areas’ best. That was still holding true this night. The showmanship, the musicianship and even the way it was all executed was no different from that of a bigger ticket act you’d pay good money to see here at Trees.

That’s why Somebody’s Darling has built such a solid reputation not only here in Dallas/Fort Worth, but even in the Mid-West — where they often tour. That’s why they can pack out pretty much ever show they do: because they deliver an experience each time they take the stage.

It’s only been five years since they released album number one, and each follow-up they’ve put out in the last few years has proven to be a cut above their previous material. With Adult Roommates, they’ve crafted something that has more depth and feeling and in a more mature manner than their previous stuff; and in a couple of years, I think it’s safe to assume we’ll be talking about another album, where they have outdone themselves yet again.

“Bad Bad” is available as a single, with the full album dropping on September 16th. In the meantime, if you don’t have their first two records, you can get them in iTUNES (as well as pre-order Adult Roommates.) Their next show will be on September 13th at Panther Island Pavilion in Fort Worth (as part of The Toadies Dia de los Toadies music festival). They also have a short tour planned in October, with shows in Atlanta, GA; Charlotte, NC; and Raleigh, NC, on October 17th, 18th, and 19th, respectively. Specifics can be found HERE.

Friday, August 8th, 2014 – Andrew Tinker Gets the Party Going at House of Blues

image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

Opening up the party Exit 380 was throwing for themselves in celebration of their first ever vinyl record was Andrew Tinker.

It was fitting that the Denton-based musician be on the bill, given he recorded Exit 380s’ Photomaps record at Big Acre Sound. He wasn’t alone, though, and had a couple band mates to make this a full-band show.

Part of me was skeptical in a way, because after seeing him solo a few months prior, it was absolutely chilling, while another part of me was excited to see what kind of difference a full-band made.

The trio of Andrew Tinker, bassist Jacob Smith and drummer Lupe Barrera (who was so new, he had only done a couple of rehearsals with them) got their show going with a catchy, upbeat number. “…Lord knows it’s been quite, but the music never dies…” went one of the lines from the chorus. As it neared the end, Andrews’ playing on his guitar got less intense, while Lupe also greatly softened his drumming, as the three of them bridged themselves perfectly into their next track.
image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

One of the most striking parts of the entire night came at the end of it, when Andrew belted out some of the line a cappella. It was jaw dropping. He formally introduced his band mates before they tackled “I Can’t Do it Alone”, which was one of several songs they did from the Upon the Ecliptic album. The song about realizing you do need others to help you along your journey is a beautiful one; and the bass and drums made it all the more inspiring.

“…Must have been in love, must have been out of my mind… To think that you would stay through another season or two…” crooned Andrew, with nothing but his voice filling the Cambridge Room of the House of Blues. He went a little further into “Must Have Been in Love”, before he placed his hands back on his guitar and his band mates joined along, creating a sort of cinematic effect. A light drum roll then segued them into “So Does a Season End”, which found each instrument getting its moment. Andrew started the break by busting out a harmonica and doing a solo, which snowballed into a drum solo, and then Jacob letting loose some thick bass lines, as they gradually brought it back up and exploded into the final part of the song.

The soulful and poppy sounds continued with “I’ll Come Around”; and they kept the great flow they had going alive as Andrew quickly strummed on his axe, relenting some when they began “Always Loved”. Another lengthy instrumental break was thrown in, and it turned into a drum solo, with Jacob quickly getting in on the action. Eventually, they backed off it, creating the impression the song was almost done, but that was when Andrew struck with a guitar solo.
image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

They offered up one last song — another peaceful number — and that concluded their 43-minute long set.

Like I said, I was a little hesitant as to how the full-band would sound, ‘cause Andrew Tinker is the epitome of what a singer/songwriter should be in its rawest form, but man, the additional band members made the music so much more powerful in every regard.

The tight trio gave the songs more of a punch; and with it being fleshed out, the lyrics even seemed to carry more weight. Making it all the more impressive was knowing that Lupe had only practiced with them a couple of times, because they all looked like they had more chemistry with each other than that.

If you got out here early enough this night, you witnessed something special; and it proved to me that Andrew Tinker excels in all musical environments, be it with a band or alone.

He has a couple of records available in iTUNES, which you should definitely check out if you don’t have them.
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image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

Sunday, August 10th, 2014 - No Weapon Formed Delivers a Precise Rock Show at The Curtain Club

The Saving Abel show wasn’t originally supposed to be held at The Curtain Club, but that was where it wound up. I was okay with that, given my immense love for the venue; and actually, it made me all the more excited to see the stacked bill of local talent that had been assembled to open the show.

No Weapon Formed took the stage with quite a few eyes on them. Many were fans — some sporting their NWF shirts; and frontman Brandon Thomas stepped on stage shortly after his band mates got their opening number going. Lead guitarist Josh Presley started showing off his skills from the get go, knocking out a killer solo at one point in the track, before they dove right into the next. Drummer Dylan Burt quickly grabbed his kick drum and pulled it closer (I think it had moved slightly during that song), and then joined them.

“Thank you.” Brandon told the crowd once they had finished the track. They didn’t allow much downtime, and now rhythm guitarist Nolan Bradvica opened up their next tune, which ended with an instrumental outro between he, Josh, Dylan and bassist Soleh, while Brandon exited the stage to allow the crowd to fully focus on them. “We love Curtain Club. This is like our second home.” Brandon remarked before they unleashed another couple of songs. Brandon seemed even more charismatic than usual on the latter of those two; and both he and Josh harmonized at one point on the track, which sounded awesome. Perhaps the best point came at the end, when Brandon grabbed the mic stand and pulled it off side to his left, though he was still screaming loud enough it had no trouble picking up the sound.

It was here they found out their set was nearly over, prompting a decision to have to be made on what to close with. They choose what Brandon called their “best one”. It was, indeed, one of the highlights from their 27-minute long set, and during it, he again thanked the Curtain Club for having them out. “We fucking love you!” he told the crowd, shortly before they brought it to a rip-roaring end.

Having to axe one song may have been slightly disappointing for the band, but that didn’t dampen what was a killer show.

They have a great sound that’s not solely hard rock, but certainly isn’t just your standard rock music, either; and the wails Brandon is capable of evokes almost an 80’s rock sound.

It’s good stuff; and you should go see them if you get the chance.

They’ll be at The Rail in Fort Worth on September 5th; then on the 20th of that month you can find them at The Boiler Room in Dallas.

Sunday, August 10th, 2014 - Story of a Ghost Makes Their Mark on Dallas

The Saving Abel show wasn’t originally supposed to be held at The Curtain Club, but that was where it wound up. I was okay with that, given my immense love for the venue; and actually, it made me all the more excited to see the stacked bill of local talent that had been assembled to open the show.

For the past few shows, Story of a Ghost had been playing main support to Saving Abel; and this was their final show of their run with them.

The quartet hailed from Joplin, Missouri; and when the curtain opened on them, Logan Graves was putting a beat down on the drums. Bassist Rikki Ramirez emerged from stage right shortly after; and guitarist Aaron Hearse wasn’t far behind. The roaring instrumental intro earned them lots of attention, though the venue wasn’t nearly as crowded as it had been for the local act before them.

“How the hell you doing Dallas, Texas?!” frontman Davin Casey asked once they were done. “…Let’s make it a helluva night!” he shouted after mentioning this was their final date with Saving Abel. Rikki proceeded to clap his hands together, eventually getting much of the couple dozen people watching them to do the same; and there came a point in the track when Aaron rushed off the stage and stood with the crowd as he rocked out.

“This kinda shit does not happen in Joplin!” stated Davin, who was riding high on the crowds’ energy. Number wise, the audience may not have been strong, though people were very engaged with the outfit. “…This is a Texas exclusive!” he remarked, before glancing at all the plaques of bands that adorn the Wall of Fame. Some of them went on to achieve national fame, others will always be Dallas legends, but the one constant as they all cut their teeth here at the Curtain. He said something to the effect that this place was here because of all those bands, and then they launched into another song. Davin screamed some on that track, and when he was doing it, he executed excellent control over his voice. Really, it was impressive to hear; and when it hit a lull, he moved over to the keyboard that sit in the stairwell on and off the stage.

“I don’t know if you know this, but it’s fucking hot in Texas,” he remarked afterwards. The audience cheered, affirming they were all too familiar with this. “Are there any rock fans here?” he then asked, using that to setup a cover of “Wasteland” by 10 Years, which concluded with Aaron again getting out in the crowd.

There were some fans out there who were familiar with Story of a Ghost before this night, and now, Davin pointed them out, saying he thought they’d know this one. “…I don’t expect you to sing it with me, though,” he told them, clearly wanting to be proved wrong. So, a few people were happy to do that, and did help them out on “March”, which was backed up with a strong stage performance. With that, they were already onto the final number of their 28-minute long set; and during it, Aaron jumped into the air, doing a nice 360° spin while he was up there.

Their hard rock style was very melodic, and at times sounded a little commercialized, but not in a negative way. In fact, it gives it a broader appeal to your general audience, which of course can’t hurt any band.

They were very tight and had some great chemistry with one another, which really showed through during their performance. Would I go see them again? Yes, yes I would.

Tuesday, August 19th, 2014 – Gemini Syndrome Goes Full Throttle at Cain’s Ballroom

Just in seeing the Gemini Syndrome banner being put up on stage was enough to send their die-hard group of fans into fits of excitement.
image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

The Los Angeles-based hard rock outfit was doing main support for Sevendust on this current tour; and even on a Tuesday night at Cain’s Ballroom in Tulsa, Oklahoma, they had a strong showing of fans out.

Causing even more excitement was vocalist Aaron Nordstrom, who wandered out in the crowd several minute before they hit the stage, even posing for a picture with one very young fan. It was cool to see.

The lineup was a little different this night, as it was one of the dates Rich Juzwick was missing to attend to personal matters, meaning Gemini Syndrome would be performing as a four-piece.

The audiences’ anticipation mounted when the house lights dimmed, and many roared at the top of their lungs. Nordstrom bowed to the spectators after he stepped out on stage. “Tulsa! Tulsa!” he yelled, getting substantially louder with the second one, before screaming in more of a heavy metal voice, “OKLAHOMA!”

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(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

With that, their intro faded out, and they jumped in to the super heavy, “Resurrection”. Guitarist Mike Salerno and Nordstroms’ vocal interaction on the first couple of verses is really something to see live, with Salerno screaming one word in a throaty voice, before Nordstrom repeats it in a slightly less intense tone. Drummer Brian Medinas’ actions easily earned him people’s attention as well, from tossing one of his drum sticks into the air and then standing to catch it, to bowing to Salerno during his stellar guitar solo. Upon finishing the song, Medina again rose up from his seat, beaming at the crowd.

“How we feeling tonight? Is everybody ready for this?!” Nordstrom asked, checking in on everyone. Not only was the crowd ready for this, they seemed to have been waiting for it for weeks. “Here we go,” he finished, as they began “Falling Apart”. Bassist AP and Medina delivered a monstrous rhythm section on the track, particularly at the start; and plenty of fans were singing right along to the chorus, “…You push me to the side every single time, and I can’t help you from falling apart again.”

Just two songs in and these guys were already on fire. There was also a great dynamic at work, where the band had plenty of energy to feed off of from the crowd, and in turn, the more action packed show they were delivering just helped the audience get more lost in it all.
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“We are Gemini Syndrome. Thank you for being here,” Nordstrom then told everyone, before hitting a more serious note. “…I’m guessing every single person here is like myself, and have something you don’t like about yourself…” he remarked. “…But that shit is what makes you different…” he preached, before bellowing, “YOU ARE NOT ALONE!” Salerno then knocked out the opening lines of “Basement” — as they continued working their way backwards on the Lux album. “Let me see your hands!” Nordstrom requested before the first chorus, resulting in a slew of hands shooting up into the air. Medina continued showing off his skills as a drummer and pure love for it by flipping one of the sticks around, and later twirling it between his fingers.

“Y’all are beautiful,” Nordstrom informed the crowd, while another sample started to play. Medina was on his feet, lightly tapping some of the cymbals. “We still having a good time?” Nordstrom then asked, before saying that the first word ever in existence was “love”. “And from the bottom of our hearts, we love you,” he said sincerely. The track led to the epic intro for “Mourning Star”, which saw this hard rock band showing off the slightly softer side they are capable of, and they pull it off exceedingly well.

The segue into their next song was seamless; and now, another guitar was brought out on stage. “Y’all don’t mind, do you, if I play a little guitar tonight?” asked Nordstrom. There were no objections to it. Then again, why would there have been? “Pay for This”  was dedicated to liars and thieves; and while it was slightly strange seeing Nordstrom abandon his role of frontman (even if it was just for one song), he still managed to pack a ton of energy into the performance, even breaking away from the microphone stand when he could. AP was also completely in the zone on that track, and he hunched over his bass for the first verse or so, just dominating it.
image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

Like the previous transition, a sample track led them into what was coming next; and as Nordstrom handed his guitar off, he thanked the crowd for “indulging” him on that.

“Tulsa!” he suddenly shouted, raising his voice when he repeated the city’s name. “Make some fucking noise!” he then stated, making it sound more like a command, and one fans were happy to meet. “…Let me see everyone’s hands in the sky, like you’re reaching for heaven,” he then told everybody, after saying they’d need some help with this next one. The onlookers proceeded to clap along as “Stardust” got going. “…It’s no mistake; …you are perfect in my mind…” the audience sang along, loud enough you could kind of hear them at times, something the frontman highly encouraged. Medina had continued to be a driving force this night; and as they hit the songs’ lull, he again stood up and flipped a stick into the air, still smiling, as if he was having the time of his life.

“THANK YOU!” Nordstrom hollered as soon as it was over. Already, this incredible set had reached its end, and they had packed so much into it, I was surprised they had only been on stage about thirty-minutes at this point. “We’re going to end this very similar to the way we started.” Nordstrom announced. His voice dropped to a sudden whisper. “Tulsa,” he quietly said, as if he were about to share a secret with everyone. It progressively got louder, though, and the rise in it was rapid. “Get the fuck up!” he instructed as they wrapped it up with “Pleasure and Pain”. It induced a lot of head banging among everyone; and the band made sure to pull out all the stops during it. Salerno and AP jammed next to one another during the second verse, and Nordstrom stamped his foot and banged his head to the most brutal parts of it; while Medina couldn’t resist doing one more toss of his drum stick, and I think this one was the highest yet.
image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

“From the bottom of our hearts, we fucking love you,” Nordstrom stressed at the end, his gratitude being purely genuine. “Sevendust is about to destroy you…” he finished, as their 35-minute long set came to an end. That wasn’t the last time he was on stage this night, though. He also joined Sevendust to co-sing their encore of “Splinter”.

Coincidently, the only other time I have seen Gemini Syndrome also happened to be in Oklahoma (at Rocklahoma), and while they were great then, this slightly longer set made all the difference.

Even being down a member these guys still laid waste to the stage at the historic Cain’s Ballroom with ease. Their showmanship was superb, and you can tell each one of them thoroughly enjoys being on a stage and performing for whoever is watching. They functioned at a level that is well above many of their counterparts, and this show made it all too easy to see why Gemini Syndrome is a band on the rise. They even gave Sevendust a serious run for their money, which is no small feat.

The final show of this run with Sevendust is August 23rd in Sioux City, Iowa at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino. Gemini Syndrome also has some dates through the rest of the month, scattered about Colorado; New Mexico and Nevada. Full info on when and where can be found HERE. Also, if you don’t have Lux, do your ears a favor and go pick it up in iTUNES.

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image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)