Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen Earn 4 IBMA Award Nominations, Including Instrumental Group of the Year

imageHot on the heels of their Aug. 12 Compass Records release, Cold Spell, Washington, D.C.’s Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen learned they received multiple 2014 International Bluegrass Music Award nominations, including a repeat nomination for Instrumental Group of the Year. And last week, the album entered Billboard’s Bluegrass Music Chart with a Hot Shot Debut at No. 3.

The Nashville-based International Bluegrass Music Association also nominated bandleader Solivan for Male Vocalist of the Year and Mandolin Player of the Year, and 2013 Banjo Player of the Year winner Mike Munford earned another nomination for that award. In 2013, guitarist Chris Luquette received the Momentum Award for Instrumentalist of the Year, a performance award. The band, which also includes bassist Danny Booth, was nominated for Recorded Event of the Year and Emerging Artist of the Year in addition to the Instrumental Group nod.

The 25th annual International Bluegrass Music Awards will take place October 2 at the Duke Energy Center for the Performing Arts Memorial Auditorium in Raleigh, N.C., as part of IBMA’s World of Bluegrass Week.

In addition to appearing in Raleigh, the band’s got a full schedule of tour dates through October, starting with a week in Sorrento, British Columbia, at the Nimble Fingers Bluegrass & Oldtime Music Festival. (See list below.)

Following their appearance in June at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, No Depression’s Jake Schepps wrote: “Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen, with their blazing IBMA Banjo Player of the Year Mike Munford, put on a fantastic show … I love this band. Great energy and superlative musicianship.”

The band’s 2013 Compass Records debut, On The Edge, reached the top 10 on Billboard’s Bluegrass Albums chart. With guests Leon Alexander, Sam Bush, John Cowan, Rob Ickes and Megan McCormick, Cold Spell is poised to do the same. For a look at what the excitement’s about, view their performance of “No Life in This Town,” recorded by videographer Dan Foldes at the Telluride Bluegrass Festival.

For ticket information and show updates, check dirtykitchenband.com/schedule.

Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen tour dates:
Aug. 23-29 – NimbleFingers Bluegrass & Oldtime Music Festival, Sorrento, B.C., Canada
Aug. 31 – Delaware Valley Bluegrass Festival, Woodstown, N.J.
Sept. 4 – The Tractor Tavern, Seattle
Sept. 5 – Alberta Rose Theatre, Portland, Ore.
Sept. 6-7 – Sisters Folk Festival, Sisters, Ore. (with Peter Rowan)
Sept. 12 – Caffe Lena, Saratoga Springs, N.Y.
Sept. 13 – The Cooperage (RiverFolk Concerts), Honesdale, Pa.
Sept. 14 –Hill Center (American Roots Music Series), Washington, D.C.
Sept. 14 – Hampstead Hill Festival, Baltimore 
Sept. 18 – Ashland Coffee & Tea, Ashland, Va. (CD release show)
Sept. 19-20 – Berlin Fiddler’s Convention, Berlin, Md.
Sept. 20 – Dogfish Head Brewpub, Rehoboth Beach, Del.
Oct. 1 – IBMA World of Bluegrass (live broadcast), Raleigh, N.C.
Oct. 2 – MerleFest Bluegrass Ramble, Raleigh, N.C. 
Oct. 4 – Albino Skunk Music Festival, Greer, S.C.
Oct. 10 – Station Inn, Nashville
Oct. 17 – Bloomin’ Bluegrass Festival & Chili Cook-off after-party, Night Hotel, Dallas
Oct. 18 – North Caroline High School (Caroline County Council of Arts benefit), Ridgely, Md.
Oct. 19 – Philadelphia Folksong Society (with Spuyten Duyvil), Philadelphia
Oct. 24 – Palmetto Brewing Co. (the Loading Dock Series), Charleston, S.C.
Oct. 25 – Edisto Island Mostly Bluegrass Festival, Edisto Island, S.C.

Follow Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen:
dirtykitchenband.com

facebook.com/frank.solivan.and.dirty.kitchen

twitter.com/franksolivan

Lost & Nameless Hits Its Stride with New ‘When You Walked Into the Room’ on Sept. 9

imageWith their second EP of 2014, fiddle-driven folk-rock band Lost & Nameless are actually making quite a name for themselves. When You Walked Into the Room, releasing Sept. 9, continues the musical adventure the Austin-based foursome embarked upon with their March EP,Empty Spaces. That one earned them a succession of positive reviews, and the new one, also recorded in Nashville with Grammy-winning producer Bil VornDick, is poised to do the same.

In fact, When You Walked Into the Room was recorded during the same sessions that produced Empty Spaces, their fourth release since the band solidified its lineup in 2008. That was the year Patrick Conway (vocals, guitars and banjo), Chris E. Peterson (mandolin, fiddle and vocals) and Nathan Quiring (piano, organ, accordion and vocals) added Kimberly Zielnicki (vocals, fiddle, bass and piano) — then an 11-year-old fiddle protégé of Peterson’s. Four years later, she won the 2012 Old Settler’s Music Festival Youth Talent Competition.

Together, they create a lively blend of old and new that draws from a vast array of influences. Michael Corcoran, the dean of Austin music journalists, wrote of the last EP in Austin Post: “[It’s] full of songwriting a bit punchier than most of the newgrass stuff going around, with Zielnicki’s smooth belting a bonus.”

Austin Monthly added, “The latest feel-good collection of songs from this country-folk quartet might jolt you into a full-blown foot stomp.”

And Twangville noted, “Right from the get-go you know this is going to be an interesting listen.”

EP features six tracks; the title tune reflects Conway’s experience with love at first sight, while Zielnicki’s “Say Goodbye” revisits a relationship’s end.

The closing track, the only non-original, combines “Matthew’s Reel” by Erin Shrader and “Reel a Levis Beaulieu,” a traditional French Canadian fiddle tune. It’s made for dancing; come step out with Lost & Nameless when they walk into a room near you.

Lost & Nameless performance dates:
Sept. 4 – Heritage Place Amphitheater, Conroe, Texas
Sept. 12 – Cactus Cafe, Austin (EP release show)
Sept. 20 – Montgomery Wine & Music Festival, Montgomery, Texas
Oct. 19 – Central Presbyterian Church, 175th anniversary celebration, Austin
Oct. 19 – St. Richard’s Episcopal Church Great Pumpkin Festival, Round Rock, Texas
Nov. 8 – Fischer Fest, Fischer, Texas

Follow Lost & Nameless at:
lostandnameless.com
facebook.com/lostandnameless
twitter.com/LostAndNameless

Foxtrot Uniform to Release New Album, Cisco, with a show at The Foundry on Saturday

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Foxtrot Uniform has released a couple albums during the few years they’ve been a band, but coming Saturday, they’ll have something that better reflects their current style.

Both their debut EP and first LP were done entirely by Kenny Uptain (vocals and guitar) and Kelly B Test (drums), the bands two founding members. Since those two releases, the two have steadily grown their outfit into a full-band, though, adding Katie Robertson (piano, backing vocals), James Hughes (bass) and Morris Holdahl (guitar) into the group.

It’s strengthened their Americana/roots rock sound, allowing them to flesh out some of their older material and write some new songs that even better represent the band they’ve grown into.

On September 2nd, their first album with a full-band, Cisco, will officially drop on online retailers. However, if you live in or near Dallas, you can get a slightly advanced copy when the band plays a CD release show at The Foundry on Saturday.

I caught one of their recent Dallas gigs, finally seeing them for the first time in a couple of years and they are superb. A definite must-listen for any and all Americana fans.

Show info:
Saturday, August 30th at The Foundry in Dallas.
All ages.
Cody Jasper at 9 / Foxtrot Uniform at 9.
Free.

King Camel Will be Throwing One Big Birthday Bash on Saturday

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King Camel Will be Throwing One Big Birthday Bash on Saturday
Jeffrey Brown (the man behind King Camel Productions) seems to have become one of the busiest promoters in North Texas. You can expect at least a handful of shows from him a month, and often, he’ll present multiple ones a week; and he’s not afraid to book a show in the middle of the week, either. Even if it means taking a slight loss, which does happen from time to time. It’s just the nature of the business.

He’s a music fan first and foremost, and has often said that he just wants to put on a kickass show. One he knows he himself would love to see as a fan. It’s a perspective not just every promoter has, and it’s one to respect, because he truly does take the fans into account.

So, you can bet that was thinking not only of himself, but also all the potential attendees when he put together his 1st King Camelversary show at Club Dada.

A whopping seventeen bands will perform, most doing thirty-minute sets; and with both the indoor and outdoor stages being utilized, there will be no downtime. Just one band right after the other for at least nine hours.

Bands like Dead Mockingbirds, Blackstone Rangers, Cutter, Bashe, Fogg, Matthew & the Arrogant Sea, International Bitterness Unit, Mercury Rocket and many others have been tapped to play. Oh, there’s also a secret headliner that has yet to be revealed.

So, as the next festival season gets underway, go support a local one. You’ll get to see a ton of great bands all for one low price. You can’t go wrong with that.

Show info:
Saturday, August 30th at Club Dada in Dallas.
All ages.
Doors @ 4 / Music @ 4:30.
$10 in advance / $13 day of show.
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Saxon’s Biff Byford Fronts Film Concept Group, The Scintilla Project - New Album ‘The Hybrid’ Coming Next Week

image“Scintilla”, a science fiction thriller, is set deep underground in the wilds of a former Soviet state where strange genetic experiments are taking place. A war weary mercenary is hired to lead a company scientist to the secret underground laboratory and with his team of mercenaries to steal the research in the laboratory. Along the way the good people face dangerous militia involved in a bloodthirsty civil war, strange monsters lurking in the abandoned tunnels of the old Soviet bunker and finally they meet the scientist running the genetic experiments and her terrifying secret.

The film has inspired a newly formed super-group THE SCINTILLA PROJECT, fronted by SAXON’s own BIFF BYFORD, who will be releasing their album The Hybrid in the U.S., featuring songs inspired by the film, onSeptember 2, 2014 via UDR Music. Select tracks on the record are co-produced by world-famous heavy metal producer Andy Sneap, who also plays guitar on these tracks.

Biff Byford states, “I was introduced to Lionel Hicks by Toby Jepson while recording ‘Call To Arms’. This was leading SAXON to write a song for the Lionel Hicks produced film ‘Scintilla’. As the film developed through production, our minds began working – maybe we could put together a concept album based on and inspired by the film. While I was having a break from writing with SAXON, Lionel Hicks, Anthony Ritchie (both ‘Balance Of Power’), and I decided that I would produce and also sing on the album. I brought in Andy Sneap to co-produce and play guitar on some tracks.”

Tracklisting:
1.      Scintilla (One Black Heart)
2.      Beware The Children
3.      Permanence
4.      Some Nightmare
5.      Angels
6.      Pariah
7.      The Damned And Divine
8.      Life In Vain
9.      No Rest for The Wicked (SAXON recording as featured in the film – taken from ‘Call To Arms’)

THE SCINTILLA PROJECT:
Biff Byford (vocals)
Lionel Hicks (drums)
Anthony Ritchie (bass)
Andy Sneap (guitar)

Bad Mountains’ Debut EP Will Get a Proper Release on Friday

imageEarlier this year, when Jesse Anderson and the rest of Bad Mountain released their debut album (simply titled Bad Mountain), it didn’t get a lavish release. Not like what any album deserves, given all the time, effort and money that is put into these pieces of art.

However, having that EP did help firmly establish Bad Mountain as a band; and they are set apart from any other band in the North Texas music scene due to their heavy focus on the ragtime genre of music. Elements of folk, Americana and roots (among others) are easily found in the music as well, music that makes you feel like you’ve stepped back in time and walked into a saloon in the Old West.

Anderson and his fellow musicians that comprise the band take more of a DIY approach to things, so it was only a matter of time before Hand Drawn Records discovered them and welcomed them to their roster.

HDR will be re-releasing the self-titled debut EP from Bad Mountain; and to make things a little more special, five limited edition mason jars with a Bad Mountain logo etched onto them will be given away at the CD release party at The Foundry.

So, go out, see a free show, maybe get one of those mason jars (if you’re lucky) and pick up a copy of the EP if you don’t have one yet. Basically, help make Bad Mountains’ CD release show the party it should have been the first time around.

Show info:
Friday, August 29th at The Foundry in Dallas.
All ages.
The Hazardous Dukes open @ 9 / Bad Mountain @ 10.
Free.
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Saturday, August 23rd, 2014 – Somebody’s Darling Rolls a Homecoming and Album Release Show into One Grand Event

This night wasn’t all that different from October 6th, 2012.

Well, it was considerably warmer than that October night nearly two years ago; but the other circumstances were quite similar.

Back in late 2012, Somebody’s Darling finished up a tour in their hometown, a show that also served as the album release party for their sophomore record, Jack City Shakedown.

The venue was different this night, and Trees can accommodate far more people than the club they did their last CD release at. The space was needed, too. This was also their first show back since completing a tour, which included some dates in Wisconsin and Illinois earlier in the month, while this Dallas show was their fourth straight, after doing a run through Houston, San Antonio and Austin.

Trees was pretty packed even during the main support act; and when 10:30 rolled around, people were already claiming their spots in front of the stage. By the time the curtain opened at 10:50, you were pretty much stuck where you were at, as folks stood shoulder to shoulder with one another.

The band had promised to play everything off the new album Adult Roommates, and they began tackling the release with the sixth cut off it, “Vowels Flow”. “Where’s your honey? Where’s your soul?” singer and rhythm guitarist Amber Farris crooned at the start, adding a lot of soul into the roots/rock number. Their performance exploded before the final chorus, when the quintet went all-out on the instrumental section, and Amber hunched over her guitar, tearing it up, as she first walked over to lead guitarist David Ponder, and then went to bassist Wade Cofer on stage left, before returning to the main mic.

“Alright!” she shouted in her twangy voice, as if to say they were just getting warmed up. With that, they went into the newly released single and lead track, “Bad Bad”, with Nate Wedan laying down a beat that was perfect to bob your head to. These songs may be new, but they have been worked into the live shows for months. Even back in January and February (the last two times I saw them) they were doing large amounts of new material. So, their fans are familiar with them, and that was what was cool about tonight. People already love these songs, and “Bad Bad” was one that received some mighty cheers as they started it.

The night wasn’t entirely about the new stuff, though.

“Where you at, Dallas?! Where you at?!” Amber asked, getting a loud response from everyone. “Let me tell you something,” she added. Nate had already started on the drum bed for the next song, and Amber then jumped right into the lyrics. “Well, I believe God made a lover for me…” she sang on “Back to the Bottle”. They played half of the songs from that previous release, and this one raised the excitement level considerably, especially during the instrumental jam, where the keys Mike Talley was playing where highlighted. David and Amber stood back to front with each other as they cranked out some notes, and shortly after, she and Wade were face to face with one another, rocking out. Her face was seldom seen during that time, as it was shrouded by her long, curly locks.

“Thanks, goddammit!” exclaimed Amber after brushing the hair from her face. “How you doing, Trees?!” she then asked, getting another rise from everyone. “That feels good. I love you guys!” she remarked with a warm smile on her face. As she spoke, a large cloud of smoke billowed out from the stage towards the audience; and then they went for one of their heartbreakers. Upon hearing it back in January, “Come to Realize” was an instant favorite of mine; and I do believe they made some tweaks while recording it. It sounded more fleshed out than I recalled, though it’s still wrought with emotion. “So I think about the morning, the way the coffee fell, and I came to realize I was by myself. And I wanted to know, was it me? Was it you?” goes the second verse of the song that epitomizes heartache. Wade lent his voice to the track, helping with some backing vocals on the chorus, and together, he and Amber sounded quite impressive.

“We’re selfish, and we like to throw parties for ourselves,” Amber joked afterwards, saying that was why they had The Suffers open up for them (that soul band from Houston had a party going in their own right.) “Let’s do it!” Amber finished, informing everyone this next song was titled “Set It Up”. David served up a superb solo during it; and upon finishing it, Amber mentioned that everyone in the band had done some writing on this new album, something that hasn’t happened in the past.

Mike was responsible for writing the next one. “It goes like this,” stated Amber. Mike and Wade crooned along with her on the profound chorus of “End of the Line”, “This is the oldest we have been; this is the youngest we will ever be.” There were many haunting elements about it as they slowed the pace down; and upon reaching the final chorus, the crowd burst into another round of cheers.

“Where you at, Dallas?!” Amber again asked, before informing everyone they had got home at five in the morning after their show in Austin. “This is why we do this,” she said, beaming at all the North Texas residents who had come out to support this night. David showed off his skills with another slickly done solo during “Same Record”; and once it was over, Amber asked for everyone to give it up for Wesley [Geiger], who had opened the show. “Once again, we’re selfish. We like to throw parties,” she joked.

“Alright, now here we go,” she said, as they brought out another oldie in the form of “Weight of the Fear”. The one thing with older tracks a band has been playing for a few years is that they have done it so many times, it’s just second nature. That was highlighted with that staple from Jank City. The clap along that came at the lull made everyone a part of the song; and David was killing it, often capturing everyone’s full attention.

“Cheers, Dallas!” Amber shouted, making a toast to all their friends and fans. “…We’ve been a band for a long time, and we’re excited to still be doing it,” she said, speaking of having a chance to put out yet another record. That said, they kept going with album number two, by doing “Keep Shakin’”. The amount of cheers and whistling that followed the end of that song was unreal. Everyone here was a die-hard Somebody’s Darling fan, and they were making it well known.

“Can I introduce the band?” asked Amber, who then took a few minutes to introduce “Red Pants on guitar” (AKA David Ponder), as well as Nate “Grizzly Bear”. “I stole the best bass player in town, and I don’t feel bad about it,” she remarked before naming Wade. Once that was taken care of, Amber swapped out her electric guitar for an acoustic. She said a few of them had a hand in writing this next one, as did Jonathan Tyler (of Jonathan Tyler & The Northern Lights.) It was the next to last song off the album, “Smoke Blows”, and despite the acoustic, it wasn’t that slow of a song.

The five-piece even dug all the way back to their first album, and the lone track they did from it was “Cold Hearted Lover”. Even now, it’s still a beloved tune, and peoples reaction to it this night proved that. Afterwards, something surprising happened. Wade, who is usually silent sans the backing vocals, spoke. “You guys know how to bounce?” he asked. “Come on, we need everybody to bounce,” he said, trying to get some movement going before one of the singles off Jank City Shakedown, “Cold Hands”. There wasn’t much jumping about, though Amber did try to get another clap along going. It started off slow, with few participants, though. “I see you in the back. We’re not starting till you’re all doing it,” she told the audience, prompting some more people to get involved. “I need this!” she shouted enthusiastically.

No sooner had they finished, and then David started them onto to the next one. Amber just laughed and shook her head. “We weren’t gonna do it, but let’s do it. Screw it,” she said. In the last year plus, they’ve made Faces’ “Stay with Me” into a staple of their longer sets, and I don’t think anyone would have viewed the night complete if they hadn’t done it. It became a massive sing-along, not just with the crowds aiding them, but also some of the many musicians who had come out to support their friends this night. Most of Goodnight Ned got up on stage and helped on the choruses, as did Corey Howe, from Dead Flowers.

“We’re happy that Trees let us party here tonight,” said Amber, thanking the venue one last time before they wrapped their 68-minute long set up with the final track, “Keep This Up”. More clapping was required as they gave their set a fun sendoff, as was singing. Even if people didn’t know the lyrics, the refrain of, “How can I keep this up?” was easy to pick up on.

If there hadn’t been a couple of songs missing, you would have thought they were done. But everyone knew better, and after a couple minutes of shouting, Amber ran back down the stairs from the green room and out on the stage.

“We got to get the boys out!” she said, looking that way. David returned, as did Nate, who simply sit behind the kit and watched his band mates during “Two Lords”. Amber had her hands free, and David grabbed the acoustic. “…It’s super meaningful to us. We wrote it about a buddy of ours,” she said before the song, which deals with two fellow musicians who took their own lives. “…I wish I could have told them I’d hate they way they leave,” went one of the lines of what was a chilling song, and one only those familiar with the D/FW music scene will truly understand and appreciate.

The full band was intact now, and they had saved their biggest two for last. “Wedding Clothes” was one; and as Nate rolled them into the last song, he proceeded to clap along to the beat he was delivering on the kick drum. Much of the crowd joined along. “Generator” was the final song they had to do off Adult Roommates, and it has been a routine closer for many months now. “Thank you again Dallas for coming out…” Amber said during the instrumental break, pointing out that the album wouldn’t be available digitally until September 16th, so everyone here was getting the “exclusive”.

That powerhouse number concluded not only their 14-minute long encore, but also one epic night.

This was what an album release show should be. A club packed with fans who are anxious not only about getting their hands on the latest release from a band they love, but also seeing them pull out all the stops to make this something more than just your average show.

The last few times I had seen Somebody’s Darling they were clicking on a level that affirmed they were one of the areas’ best. That was still holding true this night. The showmanship, the musicianship and even the way it was all executed was no different from that of a bigger ticket act you’d pay good money to see here at Trees.

That’s why Somebody’s Darling has built such a solid reputation not only here in Dallas/Fort Worth, but even in the Mid-West — where they often tour. That’s why they can pack out pretty much ever show they do: because they deliver an experience each time they take the stage.

It’s only been five years since they released album number one, and each follow-up they’ve put out in the last few years has proven to be a cut above their previous material. With Adult Roommates, they’ve crafted something that has more depth and feeling and in a more mature manner than their previous stuff; and in a couple of years, I think it’s safe to assume we’ll be talking about another album, where they have outdone themselves yet again.

“Bad Bad” is available as a single, with the full album dropping on September 16th. In the meantime, if you don’t have their first two records, you can get them in iTUNES (as well as pre-order Adult Roommates.) Their next show will be on September 13th at Panther Island Pavilion in Fort Worth (as part of The Toadies Dia de los Toadies music festival). They also have a short tour planned in October, with shows in Atlanta, GA; Charlotte, NC; and Raleigh, NC, on October 17th, 18th, and 19th, respectively. Specifics can be found HERE.

Friday, August 8th, 2014 – Andrew Tinker Gets the Party Going at House of Blues

image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

Opening up the party Exit 380 was throwing for themselves in celebration of their first ever vinyl record was Andrew Tinker.

It was fitting that the Denton-based musician be on the bill, given he recorded Exit 380s’ Photomaps record at Big Acre Sound. He wasn’t alone, though, and had a couple band mates to make this a full-band show.

Part of me was skeptical in a way, because after seeing him solo a few months prior, it was absolutely chilling, while another part of me was excited to see what kind of difference a full-band made.

The trio of Andrew Tinker, bassist Jacob Smith and drummer Lupe Barrera (who was so new, he had only done a couple of rehearsals with them) got their show going with a catchy, upbeat number. “…Lord knows it’s been quite, but the music never dies…” went one of the lines from the chorus. As it neared the end, Andrews’ playing on his guitar got less intense, while Lupe also greatly softened his drumming, as the three of them bridged themselves perfectly into their next track.
image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

One of the most striking parts of the entire night came at the end of it, when Andrew belted out some of the line a cappella. It was jaw dropping. He formally introduced his band mates before they tackled “I Can’t Do it Alone”, which was one of several songs they did from the Upon the Ecliptic album. The song about realizing you do need others to help you along your journey is a beautiful one; and the bass and drums made it all the more inspiring.

“…Must have been in love, must have been out of my mind… To think that you would stay through another season or two…” crooned Andrew, with nothing but his voice filling the Cambridge Room of the House of Blues. He went a little further into “Must Have Been in Love”, before he placed his hands back on his guitar and his band mates joined along, creating a sort of cinematic effect. A light drum roll then segued them into “So Does a Season End”, which found each instrument getting its moment. Andrew started the break by busting out a harmonica and doing a solo, which snowballed into a drum solo, and then Jacob letting loose some thick bass lines, as they gradually brought it back up and exploded into the final part of the song.

The soulful and poppy sounds continued with “I’ll Come Around”; and they kept the great flow they had going alive as Andrew quickly strummed on his axe, relenting some when they began “Always Loved”. Another lengthy instrumental break was thrown in, and it turned into a drum solo, with Jacob quickly getting in on the action. Eventually, they backed off it, creating the impression the song was almost done, but that was when Andrew struck with a guitar solo.
image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

They offered up one last song — another peaceful number — and that concluded their 43-minute long set.

Like I said, I was a little hesitant as to how the full-band would sound, ‘cause Andrew Tinker is the epitome of what a singer/songwriter should be in its rawest form, but man, the additional band members made the music so much more powerful in every regard.

The tight trio gave the songs more of a punch; and with it being fleshed out, the lyrics even seemed to carry more weight. Making it all the more impressive was knowing that Lupe had only practiced with them a couple of times, because they all looked like they had more chemistry with each other than that.

If you got out here early enough this night, you witnessed something special; and it proved to me that Andrew Tinker excels in all musical environments, be it with a band or alone.

He has a couple of records available in iTUNES, which you should definitely check out if you don’t have them.
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image(Photo credit: Ronnie Jackson Photography)

Slipknot Announces The Prepare For Hell North American Headline Tour with Very Special Guests Korn and Openers King 810

imageThe Prepare For Hell Tour - a major North American headline tour with very special guests Korn and openers King 810 - kicks off October 29 in El Paso, TX and traversing North America through December 7. 

"We’ve been waiting a long time for this," stated Slipknot’s Corey Taylor. “Not only do we get to tour with friends who we respect, we’ve also chosen a band that represents the fury of the future. Slipknot is coming to your town. And hell’s coming with us.”

The nationwide run will see Slipknot coming hot off the heels of their US live return at their own KNOTFEST, with two unique sets at their very own three-day metal and heavy music destination festival slated for October 24 through 26 at San Bernardino, California’s San Manuel Amphitheater & Campgrounds. Powered by Rockstar Energy Drink and curated by Slipknot themselves, KNOTFEST will see Slipknot headline the Main Stage on both Saturday, October 25 and Sunday, October 26, offering fans a taste of the upcoming album with a unique concert experience each night. KNOTFEST will feature over 60 bands – including Danzig, Five Finger Death Punch, Volbeat, Anthrax, Killswitch Engage, Tech N9ne, Of Mice & Men, Black Label Society, Testament, Hatebreed, Atreyu, In This Moment, Carcass, and many others – performing on five stages on Saturday and Sunday, as well as a Friday Night VIP Pre-Party Bash (featuring Slipknot’s DJ Sid), band performances and other activities for those that purchase VIP or Camping Packages. A

“KNOTFEST is a chance for Slipknot to bring the sensory overload of a wild European festival and now we’re coming for you, California,” says Slipknot’s M. Shawn Crahan (Clown). “Playing two different sets over two nights at one location is a new experience in the history of this band. This year’s KNOTFEST is going to be on another level.”

KNOTFEST tickets are available now at www.knotfest.com, while tickets for the Prepare For Hell tour go on sale September 5 at www.livenation.com and through the Live Nation mobile app. All fans who purchase their tickets through October 5 will receive a digital download of .5: The Gray Chapter upon its official release.

Prepare for Hell Tour Dates:

October
25 San Bernardino, CA Knotfest
26 San Bernardino, CA Knotfest
29 El Paso, TX El Paso County Coliseum
31 Dallas, TX Gexa Energy Pavilion

November
1 Corpus Christi, TX American Bank Center
2 San Antonio, TX AT&T Center
4 Little Rock, AR Verizon Arena
5 Oklahoma City, OK Chesapeake Energy Arena
6 Omaha, NE CenturyLink Center
8 Madison, WI Alliant Energy Center
9 Sioux Falls, SD Denny Sanford PREMIER Center
11 Denver, CO Denver Coliseum
19 Baltimore, MD Baltimore Arena
21 Nashville, TN Bridgestone Arena
22 Lexington, KY Rupp Arena
23 Ft. Wayne, IN Allen County War Memorial Coliseum
25 Moline, IL iWireless Center
26 Kansas City, MO Sprint Center
28 Rosemont, IL Allstate Arena
29 Detroit, MI Palace of Auburn Hills
30 Toronto, ON Air Canada Centre

December
2 Reading, PA Santander Arena
3 Camden, NJ Susquehanna Bank Center
5 Uncasville, CT Mohegan Sun
6 East Rutherford, NJ Izod Center
7 Boston, MA Paul E. Tsongas Arena

 

Wayne Static Announces Co-Headline Tour with Powerman 5000

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Wayne Static, the founding member and leader of Evil Disco innovators Static-X will be hitting the road this fall on a co-headline run with Powerman 5000. American Head Charge will provide support on most dates. The tour will kick off November 6th in Waterloo, IA and is currently scheduled to run through November 30th in McCallen, TX. A complete list of dates can be found below. More dates will be added in the coming weeks.

STATIC on the upcoming tour:
“2014 has been an awesome year! We just finished up the 15th anniversary Wisconsin Death Trip tour. I’ve got the best band behind me that I’ve ever had, and I am very excited to round out the year with a co-headline tour with Powerman 5000. It’s another 15th anniversary tour! It’s a testament to both bands that we are both still going strong and the timing is perfect for us to tour together again. I am equally excited to share the stage with American Head Charge again. I believe it was 2005 when we toured together last. This is a great line up and this tour is gonna kill!”

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Wayne Static w/ Powerman 5000:
11/6: Waterloo, IA @ Spicoli’s Rock Garden/Reverb* 
11/7: Madison, WI @ High Noon Saloon 
11/8: Kimberly, WI @ Savagefest @ Tanner’s Entertainment Complex 
11/9: Fort Wayne, IN @ Piere’s 
11/11: Joliet, IL @ Mojoe’s 
11/12: Cleveland, OH @ Agora Theater 
11/13: Flint, MI @ Machine Shop 
11/14: Syracuse, NY @ Lost Horizon 
11/15: Stafford, CT @ Palace Theater 
11/16: New York, NY @ BB Kings 
11/17: Baltimore, MD @ Baltimore Soundstage 
11/19: Wilmington, NC @ Ziggy’s 
11/21: Atalnta, GA @ 120 Tavern 
11/22: Winston-Salem, NC @ Ziggy’s 
11/23: Knoxville, TN @ The International 
11/26: San Antonio, TX @ Backstage Live 
11/27: Tyler, TX @ Clicks 
11/28: Houston, TX @ Scout Bar 
11/29: Dallas, TX @ Trees 
11/30: McCallen, TX @ Metropolis

*No American Head Charge

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Friday, August 22nd, 2014 - Aerosmith Lets Rock Rule in Dallas; and Joey Kramer Returns

Just a couple weeks before Aerosmith was set to play American Airlines Center in Dallas, fans were not only concerned about the health of drummer Joey Kramer, but also if the show would even be going on in the first place.

Whatever the minor procedure was that Kramer had to undergo had kept him away from the kit; and while the show had gone on in other cities (with his son filling in), he had yet to make a full return to the stage.

Whether he would be present in Dallas or not remained to be seen, as the masses filled the arena. By the time nine-o’clock rolled around, all three levels of the venue along with the floor were packed with fans that covered the age spectrum.

I’ll also point out that one of the many songs that played over the PA system to entertain the crowd happened to “Backslider” by The Toadies. Sure, they’re nowhere on the global level of fame that Aerosmith is, though I still found it neat that a track form that iconic Texas act would happen to get played.

The lights went out at 9:12, and the massive space was filled with nothing but screams.

“Please welcome, from Boston, Massachusetts, the world’s greatest rock band!” said the voice of an announcer, barely audible over all the excitement that was being expressed.

A runway led from the stage out deep into part of the crowd, to those who were lucky enough to have floor seats; and the stage of sorts at the end of it was suddenly blanketed in smoke. A panel in the floor opened up, and from it rose Steven Tyler and Joe Perry, still engulfed in the thick haze. Tom Hamilton and Brad Whitford entered from the wings of the stage, as did Joey Kramer. It had been two weeks since he last played a full show with his band mates, and the Dallas fans would be fortunate enough to see his triumphant return.

So began 79-minutes of near non-stop action, as the legendary rock group kicked off their set with “Love In A Elevator”. Of course, the guitar solo belonged to Perry, who now stood alone at the end of the platform, shredding, though Whitford also shone brightly on it; and he and Tyler stood back to back for a bit during that time. Tyler was also getting in on the guitar action, using his mic stand (which was in tow almost constantly as he traversed the stage) as a faux axe, and he was owning it. Some fun was also had with the lyrics this night, like on this one, when Tyler shouted, “Kiss my fucking ass!” instead of “Kiss your sassafras”.

As the guitars and bass fell silent, a sample track kicked on. Kramer got no down time as he laid into the kit, delivering some powerful, steady beats. For that opening number, Tyler paraded around the stage draped in a sparkly robe. Even from up in the nosebleed section you could see all the lights reflecting off it, so it may well have been somewhat blinding to those on the floor.

Now, he took said robe off and looked at one of the cameramen, waving it in front of the camera. The impressive screen at the back of the stage showed all of it, while it quickly flashed between a host of colors, creating a psychedelic experience. The track took shape once the guitars and bass were added, and “Eat the Rich” was one of a few cuts they did from Get a Grip. Tyler was back out at the end of the runway, and he pointed the mic out towards the crowd on the first chorus, letting them shout each of the “Eat the rich!” parts. The coolest moment of the song came during the solo — again dominated by Perry — while Tyler crouched by the stacks of amps and pressed the microphone against them before they eventually brought things way down. Kramer then delivered some rapid succession beats as they picked back up; and Tyler ended it in true form to the recording. However, he first began to cough. A little violently at that, giving the impression he had gotten chocked. He stepped back from the mic for a second, then leaned back towards it, letting loose a belch, the likes of which would only come after a satisfying meal.

After two full-blown rock songs, they slowed things down slightly with “Jaded”, which came immediately after. Admittedly, I’m biased, since the Just Push Play Tour in 2001 was the first time I saw Aerosmith (or even attended a concert in general for that matter), but that’s a favorite of mine. It was a highlight of the night for me; and Tyler impressed the hell out of everyone when singing “…And ecstasy’s what you prefer,” holding that last word for several seconds. Even in his mid-sixties the man still has a voice that any singer should be envious of.

“Cryin’” kept up the slower, more emotional pace they were on; and Tyler wailed on “…makin’ love”, making a sharp transition to a high-pitched tone, before bringing it back down to his normal register. He even got face to face with Perry at the end, constantly yelling, “Baby!” at him, though Perry never broke focus on his guitar.

“Dallas, I need your help!” shouted Tyler, leading the entire area in chants of, “Yeah!” “Livin’ on the Edge” has been relevant for a few decades now, though with all the goings on all over the world, it seemed to be even more important this night. The first chorus was even changed slightly. “Every time you turn on the news, you’re living on the edge. When you catch your husband fucking around, he knows he’s living on the edge.” Later on, he bent down towards the fans, even letting a woman sing one of the lines, before pulling the mic back over to him. “…And everybody knows we’re fucked,” finished Tyler. Things tapered off, and the audience applauded, thinking it was done. Kramer then brought the song back to life, and Tyler ran around behind the kit and over to him, holding the mic by his head to let him sing the chorus. You could tell he was glad to have his friend and band mate back.

They had yet to show any sign of letting up; and once that one was done, Tyler mentioned a year. 1977 to be exact. “Come on, gentlemen. Take me back,” he said to Hamilton, Whitford, Kramer and Perry. A guy behind me was racking his brain trying to come up with all their songs from ’77, but one I did not hear him say aloud was “Kings And Queens”. Whitford became the focal point for a minute or two when he showed off his prowess on the guitar solo; and afterwards, they jumped even further back then ’77. The title track off Toys In The Attic made the spectators reach a fevered pitch. “Joe, help me out,” Tyler requested as they hit the first chorus, and both of them leaned towards the mic and sang. Tyler even had some fun at one point, holding an open water bottle down in front of his crotch and walking over to the edge of the stage. He squeezed it a couple of times, as a little bit of water shot out, and then the remainder of the contents were dumped on to people.

“Joey Kramer in the house tonight!” exclaimed Tyler, as he proceeded to lay down the beat for the next song. “He’s on fire! Watch it, he’ll get ya,” Tyler finished. Perry laid his guitar down, using it a little more like a pedal steel as they knocked out “Rag Doll”. “How are you doing up there?” Tyler asked, addressing all those in the middle section and the “cheap seats” up above. He was sincere with it, too, echoing how their performance had gone so far, because they weren’t putting on a show just for the ones who had paid for floor seats. “This place is fucking packed!” he said ecstatically, before handing the mic stand off to Perry. “… It feels like forever…” he said after welcoming Joey back, noting how good it was to have him back out there with them. “We’re going to play a little Boston blues for ya. It goes like this,” he then informed the crowd. They rolled out their cover of Fleetwood Macs’ “Stop Messin’ Around”, and Perry owned it for that time, encapsulating the frontman persona, even if he was stationed behind the microphone. Fans were also treated to one of Tyler’s harmonica solos, which was fiery and raw.

“What the fuck was that about that!?” yelled Tyler once he reclaimed the mic. “That was some original shit!” You know what else was original? “Same Old Song And Dance”. That classic was beloved by all; and making it all the more engaging was the clap along that commenced during it. “Show us some skin!” Tyler asked, referring to having people put their hands in the air. The end was ruled by Hamilton and his bass lines; while there was also a neat moment during the track when one of the crowd shots that wound up on the video screen included a young boy in the frame, and when he realized he was up there, you could tell it made his day.

“We’re gonna slow it down a bit. This is off the first album,” remarked Tyler. “I’ll give you a hint: I do not play guitar,” he joked. I don’t know how much “Mama Kin” slowed things down (if it even did at all); but even now, forty-one-years after that classic was released on their debut album, it still packs a serious punch. If anything, I’d imagine it’s only gotten better with age. As Perry launched into the guitar solo, Tyler, who had been “dancing” with his mic stand, left it out there on platform, and then raced up the runway back to the main stage. He danced about to the music his band mates were making, before having to make a return trip back down the runway when the next line came around.

“Do it! Do it!” he commanded, as they slowed things down with the gorgeous, “I Don’t Want to Miss a Thing”. (You can’t deny that is a beautiful love song, and that beauty was conveyed wonderfully this night.) “Do you like the old shit, or the new shit?” Tyler asked once they had finished. It easily could have been a rhetorical question, because he had to know what the answer would be. “OLD SHIT!” the audience boomed. “The old shit? Yeah, me too,” he responded. Perhaps that was why they were playing so much of it this night, totally neglecting 2012’s Music From Another Dimension!.

They returned to the “old shit” with “No More No More”; and then they served up the first Aerosmith song I ever heard, and the one that made me into a fan: “Dude (Looks Like A Lady)”. Considering this was the first time I had heard it live, it made my night. Right at the very end, Tyler grabbed the mic stand, picking it up from the middle of it, and effortlessly tossed it back and forth in his hands. Usually you see a frontman carry the stand around for part of one song at most, and think, “That’s cool.” Tyler takes that to a whole new level, though, making you realize that any vocalist who doesn’t drag the mic stand along with them for every step they take is simply half-assing it.

From there, they dove right into “Walk This Way”, continuing their trend of not allowing for any breaks. Somehow, a woman ended up on stage with them during that song. I missed if she was personally invited up there or somehow got past security, but the band didn’t mind it. She was harmless in the first place; and she and Tyler shook their hips to the music for a bit before he motioned for her leave so they could get back to work. The instrumental outro was a little longer, providing an epic finish.

“Thank you, and good night,” both Tyler and Perry said to the crowd, as all five of them waved to the fans, and then walked back into the darkness of the wings of the stage.

Some people left. Others shouted that they had paid money and they needed more, even yelling songs, demanding to hear them.

Five minutes passed, and then, from the same trapdoor he and Perry had made their entrance from earlier, Tyler again returned to the spotlight. This time seated behind a piano.

“Darkness, darkness…” he crooned while lightly plucking the keys. It sure sounded like he was beginning the final track off Done With Mirrors, which threw everyone for a loop. He suddenly switched gears, though; and the fans burst into cheers. The applause and cheers were deafening, but that’s just how much “Dream On” is loved. When the rest of the band appeared, Perry wound up leaping onto the grand piano, spending a few minutes up there. When he hopped off, Tyler — who was now back in frontman mode — pulled his mic stand up there to deliver the rest of the track. At the end, he swung it in the air like a sword, bringing it around to his back, where he let it rest against his neck and gripped it with both hands behind his back.

“Going down,” he spoke as the piano disappeared back into the floor. He jumped off it when it got more level with the stage; and as he walked back towards the main stage, Hamilton was strolling down the runway. His bass solo stretched on for a minute or so, before turning into the familiar intro of “Sweet Emotion”. When the video board switched to Tyler, he was suddenly decked out in some neon like colored face paint, more pastel based. “…‘Cause a month on the road and I’ll be coming in your hand,” he sang later on, again switching up the lyrics.

The pinnacle moment of the song came when everyone except Perry left the stage. The guitarist had wandered over to the amps, where he leaned in close, creating some feedback as he continued to pick away at it. He then dropped it to the floor and proceeded to bat out an imaginary fire, and then came the best part. With it still on the ground, he laid onto the whammy bar, and one by one broke nearly all six strings, still holding them in his other hand, making for an amazing effect. With that guitar being rendered useless, he was quickly handed a new one, while his band mates retook the stage, wrapping up this 15-minute long encore.

The five of them marched to the platform at the end. The money shot was delivered in a blizzard of confetti that covered that fell on everyone in the first several rows, and looked like it may never stop. All the while, the audience was giving them all the noise and applause they deserved.

“Dallas! Dallas! Thank you so much for coming and watching this band rock out,” Tyler stated. He meant it. These guys still care. Even after all these decades, they still aim to please everyone who attends, and they do it.

One by one, Tyler introduced the band, including Buck Johnson, who had been back there on the keys and some other instruments. “He’s the one making me sound so good,” said Tyler. They then bid their farewell to the city.

The house music came back on, but then, Perry returned to the mic. “Turn that down,” he ordered. He informed everyone they had been challenged to the “ice bucket thing”, and they would be doing it in Houston, saying if anyone wanted to see it, then hopefully they’d see them in Houston.

One of the last things Tyler said this night sums it all up perfectly: “Fuck, yeah! Rock n roll, baby!”

I could go on and on, but I won’t. It’d serve no point, because everyone knows (or at least should) how amazing Aerosmith is. Even if you haven’t had the pleasure of experiencing a live show.

Bands aren’t made like this anymore. I doubt many bands who have found fame in the last decade or so will still be doing what they’re doing thirty to forty years from now. It’s even more remarkable when you think of all the turmoil they went through, and despite it all, they patched things up.

They still put their blood, sweat and tears into their shows; and even though there were parts of different songs that Tyler kind of mumbled though, no one cared. It would maybe just be a sentence or two when it did happen, and it was beside the point. Hell, I think he could have forgotten every word for every song and people still wouldn’t have cared, because he was so dynamic on stage. They all were, and it made for an extraordinary night where rock ruled.

Patio Sessions Announces Fall 2014 Lineup

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Patio Sessions will return for it’s Fall 2014 installment, and something about it will be different from the previous spring and fall series. It has been pushed back an hour and won’t start until 6:30.

That later time should make it even easier for some folks to attend; and given all the local talent they’ll have coming through, why would you not want to attend at least a few of these?


Sept. 4
- Rodney Parker & 50 Peso Reward w/ Tyler Rougeux of Whiskey Folk

Sept. 11 - Salim Nourallah w/ Chris Holt

Sept. 18 - Boxcar Bandits

Sept. 25 - Cassie Holt and the Lost Souls w/ Haylee & Amanda

Oct. 2 - The Roomsounds w/ RTB2

Oct. 9 - Luke Wade & No Civilians w/ Kirk Thurmond

Oct. 16 - Home By Hovercraft w/ Low Dark Hills

Oct. 23 - Calhoun w/ Catamaran

Oct. 30 - Mariachi Quetzal - Dia De Los Muertos celebration!

Son of Soul Music Legend Johnnie Taylor, Floyd Taylor, Announces New Deluxe Edition Album

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The name “Taylor” is royalty in Soul music thank to the late Johnnie Taylor. His son, the recently departed Floyd Taylor, took the torch and ran with it following his father’s death and made a name for himself all the way up to his own death this past year. 

After successful albums with Malaco Records he had signed with CDS Records for one album. That album is now being released in expanded form as “‘Bout It ‘Bout It: All Of Me Deluxe” . This 16-track package features the full out-of-print All Of Me (which features the hit songs “I’m ‘Bout It ‘Bout It”, “All Of You, All Of Me”, “Baby I Love You” and “(Time Out) Cut To The Chase”) album along with six bonus tracks, five of which have never been released.

Floyd Singletary (Taylor), was born in Chicago and sang with a band at Dusable High School in Chicago, where he graduated. His first shows were at the Regal Theater in Chicago but Floyd held day jobs working at Children’s Memorial Hospital and Mercy Hospital while waiting for his chance to follow in his father’s footsteps.

During the 1970’s, Floyd joined his father on several concert tours and also performed with other big names like Natalie Cole, Patti LaBelle, Aretha Franklin, Johnny “Guitar” Watson, Bobby Womack, & more. Floyd remained a member of the Johnnie Taylor revue, off and on, from the mid-seventies until 1999. He also worked around Chicago on the local club circuit; his uncanny resemblance to Johnnie, both physically and vocally, immediately attracted attention. Then, on Wednesday, May 31, 2000, Johnnie Taylor died in his home in the Dallas suburb of Duncanville. Among those who sang for him at the service that day was Floyd; among the congregants who heard Floyd sing was Tommy Couch Jr. of Malaco Records, who signed him shortly thereafter. (Ironically, Johnnie himself had joined Malaco after Couch heard him sing at the funeral of soul-blues pioneer Z.Z. Hill in 1984).

3 Pill Morning Set to Hit the Road with Theory of a Deadman and More

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This fall get ready for a “Do Not Miss” U.S. national tour with Theory of a Deadman and 3 Pill Morning.  Select dates will also be with Black Stone Cherry and Fozzy!  3 Pill Morning has been in the studio working on new music and is eager to hit the road again sharing something new and ‘Black Tie Love Affair’ favorites.

Tour dates:
Aug 29 at Route 20 in Racine, WI
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Aug 30 at Taste of Madison in Madison, WI
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 03 at The Pageant in St Louis, MO
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 04 at Bourbon Theatre in Lincoln, NE
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 06 at The Myth in Saint Paul, MN
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 07 at Midland Theater in Kansas City, MO
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 08 at Ogden Theatre in Denver, CO
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 10 at Knitting Factory in Boise, ID
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 11 at Toyota Ice Arena in Kennewick, WA
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 16 at Grove in Anaheim, CA
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 17 at The Marquee in Tempe, AZ
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 19 at Backstage Live in San Antonio, TX
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 20 at House Of Blues in Dallas, TX
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 21 at House of Blues in Houston, TX
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 23 at Center Stage in Atlanta, GA
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 24 at The Fillmore in Charlotte, NC
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 25 at Muncheez in Beckley, WV
w/ Fozzy

Sep 26 at Newport Music Hall in Columbus, OH
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 27 at Ziggys in Winston Salem, NC
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sep 28 at Six Pence Pub in Parkersburg, WV
w/ Fozzy

Sep 30 at The Cannery Ballroom in Nashville, TN
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Oct 01 at Piere’s in Fort Wayne, IN
w/ Fozzy

Oct 02 at Rams Head Live in Baltimore, MD
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Oct 03 at The International in Knoxville, TN
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Oct 05 at Gramercy Theatre in New York, NY
w/ Fozzy

Oct 06 at Chameleon Club in Lancaster, PA
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Oct 07 at House Of Blues in Boston, MA
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Oct 08 at Starland Ballroom in Sayreville, NJ
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Oct 10 at Waterstreet in Rochester, NY
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Oct 11 at House Of Blues in Cleveland, OH
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Oct 12 at Number One Cycle Center in Centre Hall, PA
w/ Theory of a Deadman

Sunday, August 10th, 2014 - No Weapon Formed Delivers a Precise Rock Show at The Curtain Club

The Saving Abel show wasn’t originally supposed to be held at The Curtain Club, but that was where it wound up. I was okay with that, given my immense love for the venue; and actually, it made me all the more excited to see the stacked bill of local talent that had been assembled to open the show.

No Weapon Formed took the stage with quite a few eyes on them. Many were fans — some sporting their NWF shirts; and frontman Brandon Thomas stepped on stage shortly after his band mates got their opening number going. Lead guitarist Josh Presley started showing off his skills from the get go, knocking out a killer solo at one point in the track, before they dove right into the next. Drummer Dylan Burt quickly grabbed his kick drum and pulled it closer (I think it had moved slightly during that song), and then joined them.

“Thank you.” Brandon told the crowd once they had finished the track. They didn’t allow much downtime, and now rhythm guitarist Nolan Bradvica opened up their next tune, which ended with an instrumental outro between he, Josh, Dylan and bassist Soleh, while Brandon exited the stage to allow the crowd to fully focus on them. “We love Curtain Club. This is like our second home.” Brandon remarked before they unleashed another couple of songs. Brandon seemed even more charismatic than usual on the latter of those two; and both he and Josh harmonized at one point on the track, which sounded awesome. Perhaps the best point came at the end, when Brandon grabbed the mic stand and pulled it off side to his left, though he was still screaming loud enough it had no trouble picking up the sound.

It was here they found out their set was nearly over, prompting a decision to have to be made on what to close with. They choose what Brandon called their “best one”. It was, indeed, one of the highlights from their 27-minute long set, and during it, he again thanked the Curtain Club for having them out. “We fucking love you!” he told the crowd, shortly before they brought it to a rip-roaring end.

Having to axe one song may have been slightly disappointing for the band, but that didn’t dampen what was a killer show.

They have a great sound that’s not solely hard rock, but certainly isn’t just your standard rock music, either; and the wails Brandon is capable of evokes almost an 80’s rock sound.

It’s good stuff; and you should go see them if you get the chance.

They’ll be at The Rail in Fort Worth on September 5th; then on the 20th of that month you can find them at The Boiler Room in Dallas.